Cubs' Seiya Suzuki shut down for week as finger issue persists

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Suzuki shut down for week as finger issue persists originally appeared on NBC Sports Chicago

NEW YORK — Cubs right-fielder Seiya Suzuki has been shut down from batting practice and other baseball activities, for most or all of the upcoming homestand, as the club tries to let his sprained left ring finger fully heal before trying to get him ready to play again.

Suzuki, who’s been sidelined since jamming the finger sliding into second base May 26 in Cincinnati, dealt with persistent swelling as he pushed through the discomfort during daily batting practice the past week.

“He really wants to play and we tried to take that into consideration,” said manager David Ross, who along with team president Jed Hoyer and medical personnel met with Suzuki Saturday about the change in plans.

“We all came to the conclusion it’s not smart to have a setback,” said Ross, who estimated Suzuki’s finger at 85-to-90-percent healed — where it had stalled out the past several days. “We’ll give it maybe a week to just really calm all the way down, per doctors orders, and try to ramp up after that.”

The Cubs on Monday open a seven-game homestand against the Padres and Braves.

“There’s no real timetable,” Ross said. “But we’re just going to be patient with it.”

There have been no discussions yet about whether Suzuki might need a minor-league rehab assignment before returning, Ross said.

Suzuki, the former Japanese batting champ and Gold Glove outfielder, signed a five-year, $85 million deal in March, then was named National League Player of the Week the second week of the season and NL Rookie of the Month for April.

“It’s going to take a while, and candidly I’m OK with that,” Hoyer said. “This year is really important for him to assimilate and face big-league pitching and figure out what he needs to do going forward in his career. And coming back and having this nagging injury and not be able to do it well doesn’t make a lot of sense.

“He needs to come back when he can really compete at this level, and it’s hard to do that when your finger is swelling up all the time.”

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