Cubs, MLB face daily reminders of COVID-19 risk, decision to keep going

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·5 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Long after the Cubs finished their three-inning, Fourth-of-July vacation from the pandemic Saturday, manager David Ross returned by himself to the field, where he spent a few minutes of mostly quiet time, a few grounds-crew members working on the mound and batter's boxes in the background.

"Just taking a minute, trying to enjoy what I get to do, what this whole process is," said Ross, who walked around and gazed at the Wrigley Field green expanse and out at the scoreboard with the U.S. flag against the blue sky, then snapped a picture.

"Everybody was gone, just finished a workout and I had a minute," he said, "and it just looked cool, on the Fourth of July. Just a little moment for me."

The rare moment of calm amid the COVID-19 storm that rages with renewed force across much of the country and that roars against everything baseball is trying to build this summer was gone almost as soon as it began - Ross pulling the mask back across his face as he headed back indoors toward his office and eventually home.

Click to download the MyTeams App for the latest Cubs news and analysis.

By the time the Cubs got together again Sunday, it was time for another round of coronavirus testing and another wait to see if they'll remain one of only two teams without a known case among the players.

In between, they played five more innings of baseball and wondered how long 30 teams in 28 cities can keep their training camps functional and a 60-game season in play.

"We had meetings, and everybody knows what's at risk," said fourth starter Tyler Chatwood, who pitched three innings Sunday. "My wife is pregnant, and I have a two-year-old at home. So, I think the toughest part for me is not seeing them, but this is what I want to do.

"We all want to stay as safe as possible and we all want to get the season in."

If Chatwood, Ross and the rest of the Cubs weren't sure how persistent the micro-commitments and significant the undertaking of this 1,700-player effort, they have been bombarded with reminders each day - from Sunday's testing to the news that high-profile pitchers Felix Hernandez and David Price and Cleveland bench coach Brad Mills have opted out of the 2020 season over the risk, to Giants star Buster Posey and Phillies $118 million pitcher Zach Wheeler telling media they might yet make the same decision.

Ross reiterated the day-to-day nature of evaluating the landscape and risk and navigating the protocols and emotions.

"Everybody definitely has their radar up and wants to know we're doing everything possible," he said. "Our guys are extremely bought-in. But everybody has a little bit of a pause as you come to the park and what each day's going to be like."

Sunday was only Day 3 of a 21-day training camp before a season would open on July 24.

It was only Day 2 for some other teams. And some teams, such as the Oakland A's, postponed Sunday's scheduled full-squad workout because their intake testing hasn't been completed. Sean Doolittle of the Nationals told media the team in the nation's capital is short on some basic PPE supplies, such as masks, and he remains concerned about the league's ability to pull this off safely.

And a few miles to the south, the White Sox on Sunday said two of their players have tested positive.

MORE: White Sox announce two players test positive for COVID-19

"This not a small undertaking, trying to get a season up and running and then manage it for a 60-game season," said Cubs pitching coach Tommy Hottovy, who suffered through a frightening, painful month-long bout with COVID-19. "I think we're giving it the best chance to be successful."

In addition to Hottovy, Royals manager Mike Matheny also revealed over the weekend, he battled the virus about a month ago.

As news continues to surface about positive tests, and stars as big as Mike Trout of the Angels openly talk about whether they might opt out, the Cubs mask up in their clubhouse, continue to wash and distance and ask their own questions.

"Guys are doing a great job," Ross said. "We're doing everything possible. But for sure, there's a lot of pause around the league, and rightfully so."

Not that anyone in baseball is judging anyone who chooses to opt out. In fact, far from it, Ross said. 

"These are serious issues that to a man everybody has to look at their situation individually and make a tough choice," he said. "This is an extremely difficult environment for these players to be in. They're having to alter their routines, continue to have other things on their mind, other than performing baseball, and still trying to make it fun."

Hottovy said he had to make his own tough choice to return after talking about the concerns with family. Ross said some Cubs have family members at home with high-risk conditions for severe reactions if infected by the virus.

So far, the Brewers and Cubs are the only teams that have not reported any positive tests among its players.

MORE: David Ross indicates no Cubs players have tested positive for COVID-19

"It doesn't mean somebody's not going to test positive through no fault of their own," Ross said "We're at the mercy of this virus.

"But I'm super proud of our guys, how serious they're taking it and how they've come in so far."

And so far, they've stayed together. Whatever doubts might persist. Whatever might be around baseball's next corner.

Said Hottovy: "How it's managed, how we handle it on a day-to-day basis and manage it not only as an organization but across baseball is going to determine how this thing goes in the long run."

SUBSCRIBE TO THE CUBS TALK PODCAST FOR FREE.

Cubs, MLB face daily reminders of COVID-19 risk, decision to keep going originally appeared on NBC Sports Chicago