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The complete list of every WNBA player with a signature shoe deal

Las Vegas Aces star A’ja Wilson is dominating in the WNBA Finals, but even her unprecedented domination hasn’t garnered her a signature shoe deal. In fact, despite the record-breaking performances and overwhelming increase in viewership, there have only ever been 12 players with their own signature shoes bearing their names.

The WNBA is finishing up its 27th season, which means, on average, there have been .44 shoe deals per season. While the number has been rapidly picking up with three new deals in the past few seasons, shoe deals are not keeping pace with the growth of the WNBA.

The first shoe deal in WNBA history was the Nike Air Swoopes, named after legendary player Sheryl Swoopes. She was the first player to receive her own signature shoe, with the first model coming out in 1995.

The most recent player with a signature shoe? New York Liberty sharpshooter Sabrina Ionescu, which launched in February 2023. Currently, there are three players in the WNBA Finals with a signature shoe deal, including New York’s Breanna Stewart and Ionescu and Aces forward-center Candace Parker.

See the complete list of every WNBA player with a signature shoe deal:

Sheryl Swoopes

Mandatory Credit: Diane Weiss-USA TODAY
Mandatory Credit: Diane Weiss-USA TODAY

Shoe: Nike Air Swoopes 1-7 (1995-2002)

“I was never that kid that said, ‘I’m going to have my own shoe.’ That just wasn’t something I thought was even possible,” Swoopes said. “When I think about it, I understand how big of a moment that was. Not just for me, but for so many young girls and women coming after me.”

Rebecca Lobo

(BOB DAEMMRICH/AFP via Getty Images)
(BOB DAEMMRICH/AFP via Getty Images)

Shoe: Reebok Lobo (1997)

“I remember my agent saying, ‘Reebok doesn’t have any other women’s basketball players. … This is the way to go for you,’” Lobo recalled. “Their first offer wasn’t for a ton of money. But I said to my agent, ‘It’s enough for me to buy a used car! I’ve never owned a car before.’ ”

Lisa Leslie

Mandatory Credit: Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports

Shoe: Nike Total Air 9 (1998)

“I appreciate Nike allowing me to be a part of the process, because you hear people talk about (not being involved), and I really helped design that shoe,” Leslie said. “I loved it and I was really thankful.”

Dawn Staley

(Photo by: Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)
(Photo by: Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

Shoe: Nike Zoom S5 and S5 II (1998-99)

“The prototype probably wasn’t wearable but, yeah, I took ’em back to my ’hood to get some feedback,” Staley recalled. “Nobody had a bad thing to say about it, because I think they were all in awe that I actually had a signature shoe.

“The Zoom S5 was a beautiful shoe. Nike needs to bring that thing back.”

Cynthia Cooper

Mandatory Credit: Todd Warshaw /Allsport
Mandatory Credit: Todd Warshaw /Allsport

Shoe: Nike Air C14 (1999)

“In my mind, the Air Shake ’Em Up was my first signature shoe,” Cooper said. “I know it wasn’t technically … but, man, I loved that shoe.”

Nikki McCray

Mandatory Credit: Harry How /Allsport
Mandatory Credit: Harry How /Allsport

Shoe: Fila Nikki Delta (1999)

“It was an amazing feeling to finally put my signature shoe on in a game,” McCray said. “You got your uniform on, then you got your shoes on, and it was one of those things where you just feel like you’ve arrived. It was just that feeling of, ‘Wow! I’ve got Nikki McCray shoes on. Is this real?’”

Chamique Holdsclaw

Mandatory Credit: Doug Pensinger /Allsport
Mandatory Credit: Doug Pensinger /Allsport

Shoe: Nike Shox BB4 Mique and Shox Mique (2001-02)

“I was just so excited,” Holdsclaw recalled. “I’m from Astoria, Queens in New York, and I remember calling all of my friends back home. Some of my teammates at Tennessee just couldn’t believe it. My name was going to be on a shoe.”

Diana Taurasi

Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports

Shoe: Nike Air Taurasi and Shox DT (2005-06)

“There’s always these little moments in the shoe game that change the landscape of what is possible,” Taurasi said. “Where we are now in women’s sports, and with Sabrina getting her own shoe, I think it just lets you know that it’s on the radar. Not only for people in the WNBA, or for kids in college right now, that can be a goal.”

Candace Parker

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Shoe: Adidas Ace Commander and Ace Versatility (2010-11)

“It’s really special, and I do believe in women’s sports and I do believe in women’s power in selling,” Parker said. “To see this come to light and see all that’s come since in the 10 years in between, it means a lot to me.”

Breanna Stewart

Mandatory Credit: Wendell Cruz-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Wendell Cruz-USA TODAY Sports

Shoe: Puma Stewie (2022-Present)

“Hopefully, Puma and I will set the standard and the bar for many more WNBA players deserving a signature shoe,” said Stewart. “We want to be on the right side of history and make sure that we continue to grow this game in the right direction. Making sure that we’re setting a new standard for what women’s basketball players deserve – there should be many more signature shoes after me.”

Elena Delle Donne

Mandatory Credit: Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports

Shoe: Nike Air Deldon (2022)

“To look down at my feet and see my shoe on the court for the first time, it was like, ‘Holy cow, I’m wearing my shoe!’ ” Delle Donne said. “This was one of the biggest dreams of my career.’ So, it was cool to look down and say, ‘I created this,’ and there’s gonna be other people who can wear them too.”

Sabrina Ionescu

Mandatory Credit: Candice Ward-USA TODAY Sports
Mandatory Credit: Candice Ward-USA TODAY Sports

Shoe: Nike Air Sabrina (2023)

“I want to continue to open the door for a lot of other female athletes to get signature shoes and be in this space,” Ionescu said. “I’m very blessed to be able to continue to do so, and continue to open the door for other generations to come.”

Story originally appeared on Rookie Wire