Clemson football self-reported an NCAA violation involving the improper use of confetti

Yahoo Sports
Clemson players hold up their helmets before the NCAA college football playoff championship game against Alabama Monday, Jan. 9, 2017, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Clemson players hold up their helmets before the NCAA college football playoff championship game against Alabama Monday, Jan. 9, 2017, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Did you know that the misuse of confetti can lead to a potential NCAA violation?

Clemson football self-reported 13 minor NCAA violations during the 2018-19 season and one of those violations involved the improper use of confetti. Seriously.

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From The State, where you can see all of the heinous secondary violations Clemson self-reported:

Oct. 17, 2018: Confetti was utilized by institutional staff during a photo shoot that took place during a prospective student-athlete’s official visit.

You’re probably thinking that this is a ridiculous NCAA violation. And you’d be right. The sheer number of NCAA rules leads to absurd violations like this at programs all across the country. How dare the athlete on that official visit get confetti during a photoshoot!

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You’re probably also wondering what rule the confetti could have violated. We have an idea that it might have run afoul of this entry into the NCAA’s Division I manual.

An institution may not arrange miscellaneous, personalized recruiting aids (e.g., personalized jerseys, personalized audio/video scoreboard presentations) and may not permit a prospective student-athlete to engage in any game-day simulations (e.g., running onto the field with the team during pregame introductions) during an official visit. Personalized recruiting aids include any decorative items and special additions to any location outside of athletics facilities the prospective student-athlete will visit (e.g., hotel room, dorm room, student union) regardless of whether the items include the prospective student-athlete’s name or picture. An institution may decorate common areas in athletics facilities (e.g., lobby, coach’s office, suite in arena) for an official visit, provided the decorations are not personalized and the common areas are not accessible or visible to the general public while decorated.

At least Clemson knows it can’t use confetti like it did on that fateful October day again. That’s the upshot from all of this. Save that confetti for when you win another ACC or national title, Tigers.

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Nick Bromberg is a writer for Yahoo Sports.

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