Choi's unique swing returning to PGA Tour at Deere

Hosung Choi's unique swing will be on full display this week at the John Deere Classic as the Asian Tour veteran makes his second PGA Tour start of the year.
Hosung Choi's unique swing will be on full display this week at the John Deere Classic as the Asian Tour veteran makes his second PGA Tour start of the year.

It's Hosung Time once again on the PGA Tour.

One week after Matthew Wolff put his unique swing to use while winning the 3M Open, Wolff will be joined in the field at this week's John Deere Classic by a man who has an even more unorthodox motion. That would be Hosung Choi, whose leaning, elongated follow-through become a social media sensation and led to the 45-year-old making his U.S. debut earlier this year at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am.

While Choi missed the 54-hole cut at Pebble Beach, he retained enough notoriety to snag another sponsor exemption this week at TPC Deere Run, where he shared with reporters that he's also planning to play later this month at the Barracuda Championship in Nevada.

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Full-field tee times from the John Deere Classic

Full coverage of the John Deere Classic

"I can't thank the tournament enough, and I can't wait to show my fun swing to everybody in the U.S.," Choi told reporters. "I personally love my swing. It's a swing that I've come up with on my own for a long time, and it's a swing that has worked for me, so I personally have no issues with my swing and I plan to use it moving forward."

Choi's popularity gained traction when he won the Asian Tour's Casio World Open in November, and he briefly cracked the top 200 in the world rankings in January. But Choi has struggled since his Pebble Beach debut, with a T-8 finish in Japan in May his lone top-50 result in 10 starts since Pebble. But he remains optimistic that his head-turning motion will once again produce a few birdies this week as he gets set to make another start in front of American golf fans.

"I've practiced a lot since Pebble Beach, but I feel like with the game of golf, just like the seasons, it's always fluctuating," Choi said. "It's always different, and I personally feel like I play a lot better in the fall, but I've tried my best and practiced a lot since then. So I'm looking for good results."

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