Chili Davis reacts to Mets firing: 'I did it the way I know how'

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Danny Abriano
·2 min read
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Chili Davis soft toss
Chili Davis soft toss

Mets hitting coach Chili Davis, who was fired along with assistant hitting coach Tom Slater after Monday night's game, said he gave the job "everything" he had.

"I put in the time, I put in the hours, I worked my ass off and wherever I went I gave it what I had and what I know and I just hope that whatever I left with these guys, I hope they take it and use it to become good players because there is a great group of guys here, Davis told Mike Puma of The New York Post. "A great group of guys."

The firings of Davis and Slater came with the Mets near the bottom of the league in most offensive categories, including runs per game, slugging percentage, and home runs.

The Mets have hit just 18 home runs in 23 games this season, which ranks last in the majors, right behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

While New York has played the fewest games due to seven postponements, the 18 home runs in 23 games is still painfully low when compared to the rest of the league.

But one of the main things plaguing the Mets' offense is the fact that Francisco Lindor has been a non-entity offensively for most of the season. And Davis told The Post that he would "probably" still be the hitting coach if not for Lindor's struggles.

Apr 8, 2021; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor (12) hits a single against the Miami Marlins during the fifth inning of an opening day game at Citi Field.
Apr 8, 2021; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor (12) hits a single against the Miami Marlins during the fifth inning of an opening day game at Citi Field.

“But I think Francisco Lindor is going to hit,” Davis said. “He’s kind of in one of those funks right now where your focus isn’t there and maybe there is a little bit of in-between or doubt or whatever you call it, mentally. I have been there. The ball comes out of the hand and you don’t differentiate fastball from curveball or whatever and you are just firing. You are hoping to get a hit instead of knowing you are going to get a hit.”

As far as the inside joke some Mets players have started about fictitious hitting guru "Donnie Stevenson," Davis said he wasn't offended.

And while it might have surprised some that the Mets moved on from Davis as quickly as they did, it never seemed that his old school philosophy was a fit under the new regime that includes team president Sandy Alderson and acting GM Zack Scott.

“I did it the way I know how and each year the game changes, you get a lot more analytical people involved,” Davis told The Post. “You try to use the information they give you to help the players, to inform the players, but I don’t think anybody tried to change me. I’ve had success with good players and not-so-good players in the approach I have taken with them. It’s more of a personal approach.”