Chargers’ causes for concern vs. Eagles in Week 9

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The Chargers face the Eagles in Week 9 after suffering two consecutive losses to the Ravens and Patriots.

Now 4-3, Los Angeles has a few question marks surrounding.

With that being said, here are three reasons why the Bolts should be concerned about their matchup against Philadelphia.

Stalled offense

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The offense being out of sync is one of the primary reasons the Chargers lost their last two games. A combination of pass protection problems on the right side, questionable play-calling and too many dropped passes has had the unit in a flux as of late. As a result, Los Angeles has still been in far too many late-down situations because of their inability to produce on first and second downs. The Eagles are the eighth best team against the pass, allowing just 220.6 yards per game (8th). On top of that, Philadelphia ranks No. 1 in pass rush win rate when they blitz, and quarterback Justin Herbert is 28th against the blitz. Can they clean things up?

Run defense

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The Eagles are starting to figure out their run game. In Week 8, they earned a season-high 236 yards on the ground. Philadelphia is averaging the sixth-most rushing yards per game (131.6), third-most yards per carry (5.0) and rushing touchdowns (12). Furthermore, quarterback Jalen Hurts is lethal on the ground, sitting with 432 yards and five scores on 73 carries. While the Chargers showed improvement in this department last weekend, only allowing 3.9 yards per carry to the Patriots, it is not a large enough sample size to show it can be counted on a consistent basis. Currently, Los Angeles ranks last in the NFL in rushing yards allowed per game, rushing yards per attempt, rushing first downs allowed and rushes of 20 or more yards allowed.

Thin secondary

AP Photo/Kyusung Gong

While the Chargers won’t be facing a premiere passing offense, as the Eagles are averaging just 216.4 yards per game, it does not help that the team could be without four key defensive backs. Michael Davis, Asante Samuel Jr. have been ruled out. Alohi Gilman is doubtful. Tevaughn Campbell is now questionable. Brandon Staley has done a fine job of putting the lesser-known players in a position to succeed. However, the jury is still out for Ryan Smith, Kemon Hall, Mark Webb, who will be set for extended playing time. The lack of experience in the defensive backfield could be exposed.

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