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Caleb Williams believes he and the Bears are good — as it should be

The world of Caleb Williams now belongs entirely to the NFL and to the Chicago Bears, who made him a No. 1 NFL draft pick. The quarterback who won the Heisman Trophy at USC has now put his college career behind him. It’s all about NFL success and becoming that rarest of people: a successful Chicago Bears quarterback. There haven’t been many of them in the 100-plus years the franchise has existed.

Caleb Williams has made fast friends in Chicago, chiefly with new receiver Rome Odunze, who competed against Caleb and USC last season with the Washington Huskies. Caleb loves the investments the Bears have made in their roster. When the Bears then made a fourth-round selection of a punter, Iowa’s Tory Taylor, Caleb texted Taylor that there won’t be much punting on the Bears. It’s big talk from a big personality. A lot of people naturally don’t like it, and we’re not just talking about Detroit Lion fans, Minnesota Viking fans, and Green Bay Packer fans. A lot of people have been turned off by Caleb Williams, chiefly for the fingernail-painting and other various gestures that just create the wrong vibe. Caleb is viewed by his critics as a prima donna, and that the talk is bigger than the achievements. Cast aside the point that USC’s defense failed Caleb Williams; the reality does remain that Caleb never made the College Football Playoff or won a conference title in college. People therefore think Caleb should be quiet. We get it. It’s understandable.

However, elite athletes don’t get to where they are by failing to trust themselves and believe in their ability. Caleb Williams thinks he is good. He should. Should he shy away from huge expectations, or embrace them?

In the end, Caleb Williams’ talk won’t define his career. It will be, as is always the case, whether he performs when the lights go on and gameday pressure arrives.

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Story originally appeared on Trojans Wire