Pettersen defended herself in wake of Solheim Cup controversy

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Ryan Ballengee
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Suzann Pettersen has no regrets.

After the Europeans lost the Solheim Cup on Sunday to the Americans in an unprecedented comeback, Pettersen was adamant in defending her decision to call a rules violation on Alison Lee in the morning resumption of a Saturday fourball match.

On the 17th hole of the match, Lee, who was partnering with Brittany Lincicome, had hit her 8-foot birdie putt to win the hole some 18 inches by the cup. Walking referee Dan Maselli had started to announce the hole had been halved in par. Lee said she heard someone, thinking it was Pettersen or her partner Charley Hull, say the remaining putt was good, conceding the hole would be tied. However, after Lee scooped up the putt, Pettersen noticed and called a penalty on Lee, saying neither her nor Hull gave Lee the putt. The Europeans were deemed to win the 17th hole. The shellshocked Americans lost the 18th hole as well to lose the match, setting up a 10-6 European lead heading into the 12 scheduled singles matches.

Pettersen said she would do it all over again.

"Totally. We are all trying to win," she said. "It was very clear from Charley and me that we wanted to see the putt (made)."

She added, "I've never been more quiet in my life after seeing her first putt. We didn't say a word and unfortunately she picked up."

For her part, Hull, who was captured by TV cameras clearly walking toward the 18th tee in a move that likely inspired Lee prematurely picking up her par putt, said she was actually walking toward Pettersen to ask her about a potential concession.

"I was walking over to Suzann to discuss whether or not to give the putt and then I turned around and Alison picked up," Hull said. "A few people are saying I was walking off the green. If they watch again I was talking to Suzann."

The footage does not seem to agree.

Regardless, the Europeans had it right by the letter of the law. However, the Americans responded with more motivation, looking to protect their only rookie on the 12-player squad. The U.S. rallied in the singles session, winning 8 1/2 points to complete the biggest comeback in series history. 

Ryan Ballengee is a Yahoo Sports contributor. Find him on Facebook and Twitter.