Billboards in Kyiv are flashing messages to Russian soldiers, telling them to 'go away without blood on your hands'

armed police officer stands on a street outside Kyiv with cars going by
A police officer stands guard at a road leading to central Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday, Feb. 28, 2022. Explosions and gunfire that have disrupted life since the invasion began last week appeared to subside around Kyiv overnight.AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti
  • A billboard in Kyiv is showing messages for Russian soldiers in Ukraine's capital city, video shows.

  • One urges the soldiers to "go away without blood on your hands."

  • "How will you be able to look your kids in the eyes?" reads another. "Go away! Stay human."

A billboard in Kyiv is flashing messages to Russian soldiers in Ukraine's capital city, urging them to leave "without blood on your hands."

Associated Press correspondent Francesca Ebel posted a video on Twitter Monday showing a digital billboard cycling through four messages for Russian soldiers:

  1. "Russian soldiers are not welcome here. Instead of flowers, expect bullets. Go away to your family!"

  2. "Russian soldier, stop. Putin lost. The whole world stands with Ukraine. Go away without blood on your hands."

  3. "Russian soldier, stop. Don't kill your soul for Putin's oligarchs. Go away without blood on your hands."

  4. "Russian soldier, stop. How will you be able to look your kids in the eyes? Go away! Stay human."

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The defiant messages come as Ukrainian forces continue to hold off Russian troops surrounding Kyiv.

On Monday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky spoke directly to Russian forces, urging them not to trust their commanders or Kremlin propaganda.

"Throw away your equipment and leave," Zelensky said in a video statement posted on Telegram. "Do not believe your commanders. Do not believe your propagandists. Just save your lives — leave."

Russian President Vladimir Putin has propagated several outlandish claims to to justify Russia's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

Read the original article on Business Insider