Bill Self denies that Late Night fiasco was a jab at the NCAA

Torrey HartYahoo Sports Contributor
Kansas head coach Bill Self watches during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, in Lawrence, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
Kansas head coach Bill Self watches during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, in Lawrence, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

A week after his program came under fire for Snoop Dog’s performance at the 35th-annual Late Night in the Phog season kickoff event, Kansas men’s basketball head coach Bill Self is shutting down speculation that he took intentional jabs at the NCAA as part of the festivities.

Snoop’s performance not only featured pole dancers, but additional performers who shot cash into the air, at the supposedly family-friendly event. He was also wearing Adidas gear; Self’s program is currently under investigation for its connection to Adidas and alleged payouts to recruits, among other things.

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In the lead-up to the event, Self was featured in a hype video wearing an Adidas shirt and a chain necklace with a dollar sign hanging on it. It’s really not much of stretch to come to the conclusion that the school may have been throwing shade at the NCAA.


Self, who was already apologized for the Midnight Madness ordeal, wants to make it clear he did not knowingly participate in any mischief.

"If you followed us, I do stuff for Late Night every year. This year was no different,” he told reporters Wednesday. “I just happened to be wearing an Adidas shirt, who happens to be a sponsor for our next 14 years, that helps sponsor the event.”

“I do not like the narrative that has been said with that concerning me. But I also understand that I can’t control what the media writes or their opinions. I do know and people who know me know that that’s not factually true in any way, shape or form.”

He added that doesn’t know how a performance could even be used in the manner suggested.

“I don’t know how an entertainer in any way, shape or form would be thought to be sticking it to anybody, including the NCAA by having an entertainer perform,” he said.

Bill Self offers his opinion on ‘Fair Pay for Play’ movement

In the same session with media, Self supported the sentiment behind the California law set to take effect in 2023 that would allow NCAA athletes to profit off their own name, image and likeness.

“I think it’s been long overdue to give student-athletes the same opportunities that general students possess,” Self said. “There’s nothing that says a general student can’t go to school, be on scholarship, and go work, make money on the side and do whatever."

He did, however, note that it will be tough for change to occur state-by-state.

“I don’t believe California, and New York, or South Carolina can have it and other states can’t, so it’ll be interesting how that all plays out.”

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