Athletics' James Kaprielian describes unique pregame routine before start

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Kaprielian describes unique pregame routine before A's start originally appeared on NBC Sports Bayarea

Athletics starting pitcher James Kaprielian, who recently got his first win of the season, has a very specific routine before he pitches, which all begins the day before he hits the mound.

Kaprielian says it's essential for him to be "dialed in and feeling the right things" 24 hours before he gets the ball from manager Mark Kotsay, as he values both the mental and physical preparation.

"I do lift the day before as well, which a lot of people might say is crazy," Kaprielian told Brodie Brazil on the latest episode of "All A's."

"I'm doing super ... not extremely heavy weight; where it's like a 15-minute workout where I might be doing a quick deadlift, like some jumping stuff, trying to activate the body create just a little tension where I'm not going in too loose."

Even with all this preparation in the weight room, Kaprielian says the critical aspect that he needs heading into his start is a good night's rest and meal. The A's starter revealed that he has learned the value of getting sleep before taking the mound, as there were times earlier in the season when he got "too antsy" the night before a start.

On the day of a start, the Oakland starter says that he tries to keep it loose in the clubhouse, with music being a key component of his routine..

"I want to play some good music and make sure everyone knows that we are locked in today," Kaprielian said. "I try and keep it loose, talk with the boys and check in on everyone make sure what is going on."

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But there is a specific time when his attitude changes. At 4 p.m., the switch is flipped.

"It's my favorite part of the day because I lock in what I need to; keep it loose, keep it fun, but when it's time to go, we are ready to go," Kaprielian added.

So how much time does he spend studying opposing hitters? Days? Hours?

"I wouldn't call it several hours because I don't want to give the hitters too much credit," Kaprielian said with a laugh.