After Astros cruised past White Sox, Justin Verlander wasn't at all happy with Tim Anderson

Vinnie Duber
NBC Sports Chicago
<p>Despite dominating the White Sox in a game his team won by a 10-0 score, Astros pitcher Justin Verlander wasn't too happy with Tim Anderson after what the shortstop did on the base paths.</p>

After Astros cruised past White Sox, Justin Verlander wasn't at all happy with Tim Anderson

Despite dominating the White Sox in a game his team won by a 10-0 score, Astros pitcher Justin Verlander wasn't too happy with Tim Anderson after what the shortstop did on the base paths.

The Houston Astros put a pretty good beating on the White Sox on Friday night, waltzing to a blowout 10-0 victory.

So why was the Astros' starting pitcher so steamed after the game?

Justin Verlander, the future Hall of Famer who took a no-hit bid into the fifth Friday, was vocally upset with Tim Anderson, the White Sox shortstop who has been playing with a totally different attitude this season after his on-field struggles last season and the emotional effects he experienced while dealing with the death of his best friend.

Verlander lost his no-hitter on Anderson's one-out base hit in the fifth inning, to which Anderson, whose mission this season is to have fun playing baseball, celebrated. But that celebration wasn't what peeved Verlander. Instead it was Anderson's attempt at stealing second base on a 3-0 count - and the subsequent celebration when the steal didn't count because of a walk - and his attempt at stealing third base shortly thereafter. That play went haywire, as Anderson was picked off, caught in a rundown, safely made it back to second but just as Omar Narvaez was arriving, making an out. The two exchanged words on the field after that play.

But remember that that's another one of Anderson's missions this year: to steal more bases and get in opposing pitchers' heads with what he's doing on the base paths.

Well, he sure got Verlander's attention this time.

"I wasn't upset with him being excited about getting a hit," Verlander told reporters after the game. "Hey, that's baseball and you can be excited about getting a hit, he earned it. He steals on 3-0 in a 5-0 game, that's probably not great baseball. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't, I don't know. But he celebrated that, though. And it's like ‘Hey, I'm not worried about you right now. It's 5-0, I'm giving a high leg kick, I know you can steal. If I don't want you to steal, I'll be a little bit more aware of you. But I'm trying to get this guy out at the plate.'

"Anyway, I walk (Narvaez), (Anderson) steals 3-0, kind of celebrates that at second base again. I don't even know what he was celebrating, he didn't even get credit for a stolen base. Maybe he thought he did, I don't know.

"Then he makes, in my opinion, another bad baseball decision. Stealing third in a 5-0 game with two guys on in an inning where I was clearly struggling - I walked a guy on four pitches and went 1-0 to the next guy - and I pick you off on an inside move after the way he had kind of been jubilant about some other things, I was just as jubilant about that. Very thankful that he gave me an out. That's what I said, and he didn't like that comment but, hey, that's not my fault, that's his fault.

"I'm not going to let the situation dictate what I do out there, I'm going to slow everything down and that's what veterans can do - see the game, play the game, play the game the right way. He was a little over-agressive and I let him know it. I took offense to it."

Why all this angered the Astros' ace so much in the fifth inning of a 5-0 ballgame, that could be trickier to figure out. It sounds like another case of the "unwritten rules" of the game. But not being written down anywhere, it's hard exactly to tell which rule or rules Anderson broke.

Told after the game that Verlander wasn't very happy with him, Anderson didn't seem to be too concerned about being on the wrong side of the all-time great hurler.

"That's fine," he said. "If that's how I play, I'm having fun and it's exciting.

"I don't care what other people think, that don't bother me.

"I'm out just playing and having fun. If he took it to heart, so what?"

If anything, it's a sign that Anderson's activity on the base paths could be working as intended, distracting opposing pitchers from what they're trying to do to Anderson's teammates at the plate.

But with the results what they were, it seems even more odd that Verlander would be so upset.

Whatever the reasoning, Anderson doesn't care, so maybe we shouldn't, either.

"No, it doesn't bother me," Anderson said before having a little fun with reporters who had him repeating his lack of concern. "Does it bother you?"

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