The Paywall Is Turned Off, But You Now Have Less Than A Day To Check Out These 12 Free Features

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This article originally appeared on Climbing

Founded in 1967 by Yosemite pioneers and legends Allen Steck and Steve Roper, Ascent has kept climbing’s literary flame burning bright for generations of climbers, from the hippies of the Vietnam era to today’s crop reared on a diet of indoor plastic.

Throughout it all, Ascent has published mind-bending imagery and vertical expression from a veritable whose-who in climbing: Reinhold Messner, Jeff Long, Alex Honnold, Jim Bridwell, Tommy Caldwell, Jeff Jackson, John Long, Alison Osius, David Roberts… the roster of luminaries is nearly infinite. And it continues with this year’s edition. The editors here at Climbing are honored to present Ascent 2022--and are pleased to offer it to you for free for two days. That’s right, no paywall.

We are also stoked that for a limited time you can subscribe to Climbing for 50% off. Just $25 lands you four print issues of Climbing and one of Ascent in your mailbox for a year, plus you get unlimited online access to Climbing.com’s 5,000 article archive. Please join us by subscribing here, and we hope you enjoy this free edition of Ascent.

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Owl Roof
Evan Wisheropp on Owl Roof (5.12c), Yosemite, CA. (Photo: Evan Wisheropp)

Cleaning Up Climbing History--The True Stories Behind 13 Pivotal Ascents and Events

Climbing legend Jim Erickson pulls the curtain back to reveal what really happened … or didn’t happen. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">David Markusen and the author (age 15) on the summit of the Grand Teton, Wyoming, during an Exum-guided climb in August 1969. </span> (Photo: Steve Markusen)
David Markusen and the author (age 15) on the summit of the Grand Teton, Wyoming, during an Exum-guided climb in August 1969. (Photo: Steve Markusen)

His Father Died At His Feet. 50 Years Later The Accident Still Haunts Him.

The author lost his father in an accident at the crag nearly 50 years ago. He's taken that long to be able to write about it. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">The author on Smear of Fear (WI 5 M6 R) on Longs Peak, Colorado, in 2007, a year before he moved to New Hampshire full-time. </span> (Photo: Chris Alstrin)
The author on Smear of Fear (WI 5 M6 R) on Longs Peak, Colorado, in 2007, a year before he moved to New Hampshire full-time. (Photo: Chris Alstrin)

Risking Everything To Become A “Real” Climber

What does it mean to become a "real climber"--and do you need to risk your life in the process? Seeking an answer, the author revisits the folly of his youthful climbs in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">The author, Delaney Miller, all focus and intensity at the semifinals in Briancon in 2015</span> (Photo: Nico Graziano)
The author, Delaney Miller, all focus and intensity at the semifinals in Briancon in 2015 (Photo: Nico Graziano)

My Shining, Beautiful, Devastating Memories From The World Cup Circuit

The fist raised in victory; the bright lights; the roaring crowd--from the outside, competition climbing seems to be all glitz and glamour. But what is it like on the inside, from the lived experience of a onetime competitor? READ HERE

Affordable and Stunning, Brazil’s Developing Rock Will Blow Your Mind.

A photographer’s journey reveals unimaginable climbing wealth and beauty, and barely scratches the surface of possibilities.

READ MORE

<span class="article__caption">The school bus where Earl Wiggins, Katy Cassidy, and others lived, with the Flatirons visible in the background.</span> (Photo: Ian Glass)
The school bus where Earl Wiggins, Katy Cassidy, and others lived, with the Flatirons visible in the background. (Photo: Ian Glass)

Sibleyville Was Boulder’s Camp 4. Only Ashes Remain.

Never again will there be anywhere like Sibleyville, outside Eldorado Canyon, Colorado, where for 50 years climbers came to crash--and when they crashed. READ HERE

(Photo: Sam Lubicz)
(Photo: Sam Lubicz)

Humiliated By Honnold … With Help From Ourselves

What do you get when you give two inept teenagers two huge boxes of Snickers bars, drench them in protestant work ethic, and plop them down in a sport climbing crucible like Rifle, Colorado?

(Hint: it’s a less successful formula than it sounds.)

READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">Heinz Mariacher, the pioneering free climber and shoe designer, in his backyard of the Dolomites in August 2021. Here, he climbs the 60-meter pitch Mind Control (7b+/5.12c) at Sass de la CIaures on the north side of the Marmolada.</span> (Photo: Michael Meisl)
Heinz Mariacher, the pioneering free climber and shoe designer, in his backyard of the Dolomites in August 2021. Here, he climbs the 60-meter pitch Mind Control (7b+/5.12c) at Sass de la CIaures on the north side of the Marmolada. (Photo: Michael Meisl)

He Reimagined Climbing and Rock Shoes. He Hates Hype. You Can Thank Him Later.

Heinz Mariacher has spent four decades creating rock shoes. As a cutting-edge climber of the 1970s and '80s, he's used both his experience on rock and his eye as an artist to catapult footwear from clunkers to the precision tools we use today. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">Eva Capozzola on the summit. A happy moment, but she and Marceau were only halfway--they still had to descend and reverse back to the glacier.</span> (Photo: Pascale Marceau)
Eva Capozzola on the summit. A happy moment, but she and Marceau were only halfway--they still had to descend and reverse back to the glacier. (Photo: Pascale Marceau)

Is Minus 50 Really That Cold? Two Women Aimed To Find Out.

Mount Steele in the Yukon was seldom climbed. There were reasons why. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">Kristen Greaves (red helmet) gives a fist bump, the Gunks.</span> (Photo: Chris Vultaggio)
Kristen Greaves (red helmet) gives a fist bump, the Gunks. (Photo: Chris Vultaggio)

Young Women Who Crush

In New York City, mentees and mentors boost one another to become climbers and leaders. READ HERE

Climbing In The Abstract

The UK-based artist Ali Mulroy became a climber literally by accident--she stumbled into a rock gym, sparking a passion now at the core of her art. READ HERE

<span class="article__caption">Arizona, United States, North America</span> (Photo: Getty Images/ mark newman)
Arizona, United States, North America (Photo: Getty Images/ mark newman)

She Needed Help, What Could They Have Done?

Climbers venture into the desert to test ourselves, but beneath or even among the heights we seek, migrants may risk their lives looking for safe passage. High on the flanks of Baboquivari Peak, near a militarized border, the author finds two clashing realities. READ HERE

WE HOPE YOU ENJOYED YOUR FREE EDITION OF ASCENT 2022

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