Aaron Rodgers Has Been Taking ‘Good Friend’ Joe Rogan’s Covid Advice

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Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images


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Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who earlier this year spent two weeks as the guest host of Jeopardy!—a game show built on its foundation and embrace of knowledge and fact—has had quite the revealing week. The reigning NFL MVP tested positive for Covid-19 on Wednesday, and was quickly ruled out for the Packers' coming game on Sunday. The QB was believed to be vaccinated, and the NFL's protocols for vaccinated players would've allowed him the opportunity to test negative again before the game and be eligible to play. Further reporting confirmed that Rodgers is, in fact, unvaccinated.

Back in August, Rodgers was asked about his vaccination status. At the time, he said "Yeah, I've been immunized." He can say whatever he wants now, but clearly back in August he knew that that he wasn't vaccinated. He used the word he did very specifically. Other reports later revealed that Rodgers got "homeopathic treatment from his personal doctor to raise his antibody levels," a treatment that the players union and league agreed did not provide any documented protection from the coronavirus. He has since been considered unvaccinated.

There was a sea of anger and confusion with regard to this development. On Friday, Rodgers went on The Pat McAfee Show to try to tell his side of things, which set off a maelstrom of reactions across social media.

To kick things off, he claimed that he was "in the crosshairs of the woke mob right now," and that he didn't lie in that press conference—instead saying that reporters asking about vaccination status at the time was a "witch hunt." Clearly, he felt using "immunized" in the context he did was the truth. However, the CDC defines "immunization" as "a process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination," He was not in fact immunized. Taken from that definition, he was lying.

Photo credit: Stacy Revere - Getty Images
Photo credit: Stacy Revere - Getty Images

Rodgers also claimed that he had an allergy to the ingredients in both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, and that at the time, he had heard about bad side effects from the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, which had had publicized blood clotting issues. However, his allergy claim is also hard to believe; if Aaron Rodgers, one of the biggest stars in the NFL, had an allergy to the vaccines, surely he would have been eligible for a medical exemption from the league. If the league for whatever reason didn't grant him this, wouldn't Aaron Rodgers making this public claim be enough to get something done? This claim is worth taking with a grain of salt.

Rodgers went on to say, so, so much more (you can read threads of his statements here and here). But perhaps most notable was when he said that he was following the advice of Joe Rogan. "I consulted a good friend of mine, Joe Rogan, and I've been doing a lot of the stuff he recommended in his podcast," he said, also revealing that he's been taking Ivermectin, a horse deworming medicine that is not approved by medical experts.

He also misquoted Martin Luther King, Jr., seemingly out of context.

All in all? Let's just say we hope Aaron Rodgers wisens up and gets vaccinated. We encourage everyone to do their part and get the jab.

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