5. Washington Nationals (42–27, plus-69, LT: 3)

SI Staff
Sports Illustrated
<p>Read this <em>Washington Post</em> accounting of the Nats’ offseason, and try not to gnash your teeth in frustration.</p><p>How and why ownership would approve a megatrade for Adam Eaton, only to stop short on a trade for David Robertson, or even worse a relatively low-cost signing of high-upside closer Greg Holland (now dominating in Colorado) is a huge mystery. Granted, there’s far less urgency to fix Washington’s <a href="http://www.fangraphs.com/leaders.aspx?pos=all&#38;stats=rel&#x002276;=nl&#38;qual=0&#38;type=1&#38;season=2017&#38;month=0&#38;season1=2017&#38;ind=0&#38;team=0,ts&#38;rost=0&#38;age=0&#38;filter=&#38;players=0&#38;sort=13,a" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:worst-in-the-league bullpen" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">worst-in-the-league bullpen</a> when the rest of the division consists of a pack of one-legged raccoons, and the Nats can win the division by 20 games without breaking a sweat. But everyone in the league also knows that Matt Albers-and-pray-for-rain will end in disaster come October, making one (and probably more) moves for impact relievers a must between now and the July 31 trade deadline. Here’s hoping ownership isn’t so stingy and stubborn this time around.</p>

5. Washington Nationals (42–27, plus-69, LT: 3)

Read this Washington Post accounting of the Nats’ offseason, and try not to gnash your teeth in frustration.

How and why ownership would approve a megatrade for Adam Eaton, only to stop short on a trade for David Robertson, or even worse a relatively low-cost signing of high-upside closer Greg Holland (now dominating in Colorado) is a huge mystery. Granted, there’s far less urgency to fix Washington’s worst-in-the-league bullpen when the rest of the division consists of a pack of one-legged raccoons, and the Nats can win the division by 20 games without breaking a sweat. But everyone in the league also knows that Matt Albers-and-pray-for-rain will end in disaster come October, making one (and probably more) moves for impact relievers a must between now and the July 31 trade deadline. Here’s hoping ownership isn’t so stingy and stubborn this time around.

Read this Washington Post accounting of the Nats’ offseason, and try not to gnash your teeth in frustration.

How and why ownership would approve a megatrade for Adam Eaton, only to stop short on a trade for David Robertson, or even worse a relatively low-cost signing of high-upside closer Greg Holland (now dominating in Colorado) is a huge mystery. Granted, there’s far less urgency to fix Washington’s worst-in-the-league bullpen when the rest of the division consists of a pack of one-legged raccoons, and the Nats can win the division by 20 games without breaking a sweat. But everyone in the league also knows that Matt Albers-and-pray-for-rain will end in disaster come October, making one (and probably more) moves for impact relievers a must between now and the July 31 trade deadline. Here’s hoping ownership isn’t so stingy and stubborn this time around.

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