5 stats to remind you how well Bradley Beal was playing before the NBA shut down

Chase Hughes
NBC Sports Washington

The NBA returning later this summer with the Wizards included means more time for Bradley Beal to continue his remarkable 2019-20 season, one that made him a historic All-Star snub and left off with him putting up video game numbers on any team that stood in his way.

If you recall, Beal was on quite the tear when the league shut down. It came after he was left off the All-Star team and coincided with a reset of his shooting mechanics by his longtime trainer Drew Hanlen.

Whether Beal can pick up right where he left off with roughly 4 1/2 months between games is unclear. But here are five stats to remind you just how dominant Beal was when the league shut down in March...

37.5 ppg in his last 10 G

Right after a game against the Cavs on Feb. 21 in which he went 1-for-10 from three, Beal took off to average 37.5 points and 6.1 assists in his final 10 games. He did that while shooting 48.1 percent from three on a ridiculous 10.8 attempts.

It started with two 50-point games on back-to-back nights, making him the first player since Kobe Bryant in 2007 to accomplish the feat. That included 55 points against the NBA-best Milwaukee Bucks. Beal also dropped 42 in a game during that 10-game stretch, and in his last outing put 39 on the Knicks.

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35.5 ppg since Jan. 20

Beal's scoring barrage went back to January where soon after returning from injury he caught fire, averaging 35.5 points across 23 games. He also averaged 5.7 assists, 3.9 rebounds, 1.6 steals and shot 40.4 percent from three on 9.3 attempts per game.

The surge began with seven straight games of 34-plus points. Of the 23 games, he dropped 30 or more 17 times, 40 or more six times and 50 or more twice.

30.5 ppg on the year

Along the way in that 23-game burst, Beal raised his season scoring average from 27.2 points per game to 30.5, placing him second in the NBA and only behind James Harden. Beal is only 1.2 points away setting the franchise's single-season record, held by Walt Bellamy who averaged 31.6 in 1961-62, the first year of the franchise's existence.

Beal can only play a maximum of 65 games this year due to the lost time, so he won't come close to the total points record. But per NBA rules, as long as you play at least 70 percent of your team's games in a season, your averages count for statistical leaderboards. So, Beal is already in good shape because the threshold was 50.

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10 40-point games, two 50-point games

Beal also has some time to chase another record, that being the most 40-point games in a single-season by a Wizards/Bullets player. He already has 10 such games this year and the record is 12 by Bellamy, also in 1961-62.

WIth two 50-point games, Beal is also just one of those away from tying the franchise single-season record, held by Gilbert Arenas in 2006-07. And he is already tied with Arenas for the most career 50-point games (three), needing just one more to hold the all-time mark.

200 threes again?

The truncated season could prevent Beal from hitting the milestone of 200 three-pointers, which he has accomplished two of the last three years. The one exception was the 2017-18 season when he made 199, falling just one short.

Beal has 170 threes this year, meaning he needs 30 by the end of the regular season to hit the 200-mark. That means 3.75 threes per game on average, when this year he's making three per game, which is a career-high. Beal, though, was averaging 5.2 made threes in his final 10 games before the season stopped, and 3.9 per game going back to Jan. 20.

If Beal got to 200 threes, it would be his third such season, which would put him in the top-10 all-time.

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5 stats to remind you how well Bradley Beal was playing before the NBA shut down originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

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