24 megahits that shockingly failed to win any Grammys

Paul Grein
Writer
Yahoo Music

Commercial success is no guarantee that a record will receive a Grammy. Here are two dozen prime (and often surprising) examples. All topped Billboard‘s Hot 100 for five or more weeks, but failed to win Grammys in any category.

<p>This colossal collaboration was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Seal’s “Kiss From a Rose.” In a huge upset, it lost Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals to “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You” by the Chieftains with Van Morrison. Carey’s Daydream album also lost Best Pop Album to Joni Mitchell’s Turbulent Indigo. It was not a “sweet” Grammy night for Carey. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“One Sweet Day,” Mariah Carey & Boyz II Men (16 weeks at No. 1 in 1995-96)

This colossal collaboration was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Seal’s “Kiss From a Rose.” In a huge upset, it lost Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals to “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You” by the Chieftains with Van Morrison. Carey’s Daydream album also lost Best Pop Album to Joni Mitchell’s Turbulent Indigo. It was not a “sweet” Grammy night for Carey. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>It’s hard to believe that this all-time classic didn’t win a Grammy. It was nominated in three categories. It lost Record of the Year and Best Contemporary Pop Performance by a Vocal Duo or Group to another classic, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson.” It lost Song of the Year to Bobby Russell’s amiable but far less classic “Little Green Apples.” Both “Hey Jude” and “Mrs. Robinson” have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. “Little Green Apples” has not. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Hey Jude,” The Beatles (nine weeks at No. 1 in 1968)

It’s hard to believe that this all-time classic didn’t win a Grammy. It was nominated in three categories. It lost Record of the Year and Best Contemporary Pop Performance by a Vocal Duo or Group to another classic, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson.” It lost Song of the Year to Bobby Russell’s amiable but far less classic “Little Green Apples.” Both “Hey Jude” and “Mrs. Robinson” have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. “Little Green Apples” has not. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This elegant duet was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Kim Carnes smash “Bette Davis Eyes” (which also logged nine weeks at No. 1). It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group to the Manhattan Transfer’s “Boy From New York City.” A 1994 remake of “Endless Love” by Luther Vandross and Mariah Carey was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Collaboration, but also lost. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Endless Love,” Diana Ross & Lionel Richie (nine weeks at No. 1 in 1981)

This elegant duet was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Kim Carnes smash “Bette Davis Eyes” (which also logged nine weeks at No. 1). It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group to the Manhattan Transfer’s “Boy From New York City.” A 1994 remake of “Endless Love” by Luther Vandross and Mariah Carey was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Collaboration, but also lost. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This A-list collabo wasn’t nominated for any Grammys. The superstar pals (who would later have a falling out) had been nominated for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal the previous year for their too-cute duet, “The Girl Is Mine.” It lost to the Police’s “Every Breath You Take.” (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Say Say Say,” Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson (six weeks at No. 1 in 1983-84)

This A-list collabo wasn’t nominated for any Grammys. The superstar pals (who would later have a falling out) had been nominated for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal the previous year for their too-cute duet, “The Girl Is Mine.” It lost to the Police’s “Every Breath You Take.” (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This lovely ballad — a remake of a 1927 hit — was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Percy Faith’s shimmering instrumental “Theme From a Summer Place.” It lost two awards (Best Performance by a Pop Single Artist and Best Vocal Performance, Male — Single or Track) to Ray Charles’s “Georgia on My Mind.” All three of these recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Are You Lonesome To-night?,” Elvis Presley (six weeks at No. 1 in 1960)

This lovely ballad — a remake of a 1927 hit — was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Percy Faith’s shimmering instrumental “Theme From a Summer Place.” It lost two awards (Best Performance by a Pop Single Artist and Best Vocal Performance, Male — Single or Track) to Ray Charles’s “Georgia on My Mind.” All three of these recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>Gaga’s LGBT anthem wasn’t nominated for a Grammy, though her album of the same name was nominated for Album of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Album. (It lost both awards to Adele’s blockbuster, 21.) Another track from the album, “You and I,” was nominated for Best Pop Solo Performance. Adele won that one too. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Born This Way,” Lady Gaga (six weeks at No. 1 in 2011)

Gaga’s LGBT anthem wasn’t nominated for a Grammy, though her album of the same name was nominated for Album of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Album. (It lost both awards to Adele’s blockbuster, 21.) Another track from the album, “You and I,” was nominated for Best Pop Solo Performance. Adele won that one too. (Photo: Getty Images)

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“California Gurls,” Katy Perry feat. Snoop Dogg (six weeks at No. 1 in 2010)

(Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This sublime ballad wasn’t even nominated for a Grammy. Another of the J5’s early hits, “ABC,” was nominated that year for Best Contemporary Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group, or Chorus. It lost to the Carpenters’ “(They Long to Be) Close to You.” All three of these recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. A 1992 cover of “I’ll Be There” by Mariah Carey featuring Trey Lorenz was nominated for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but lost. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“I’ll Be There,” The Jackson 5 (five weeks at No. 1 in 1970)

This sublime ballad wasn’t even nominated for a Grammy. Another of the J5’s early hits, “ABC,” was nominated that year for Best Contemporary Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group, or Chorus. It lost to the Carpenters’ “(They Long to Be) Close to You.” All three of these recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. A 1992 cover of “I’ll Be There” by Mariah Carey featuring Trey Lorenz was nominated for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but lost. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This sexy, strutting smash was nominated for two Grammys — Record of the Year and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance. It lost in both categories to “Get Lucky” by Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers. Thicke’s Blurred Lines album lost Best Pop Vocal Album to Bruno Mars’s Unorthodox Jukebox. Note: Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit, “Got to Give It Up (Pt. I),” which “Blurred Lines” was found in court to have plagiarized, was nominated for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male, but lost. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Blurred Lines,” Robin Thicke feat. T.I. + Pharrell (12 weeks at No. 1 in 2013)

This sexy, strutting smash was nominated for two Grammys — Record of the Year and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance. It lost in both categories to “Get Lucky” by Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers. Thicke’s Blurred Lines album lost Best Pop Vocal Album to Bruno Mars’s Unorthodox Jukebox. Note: Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit, “Got to Give It Up (Pt. I),” which “Blurred Lines” was found in court to have plagiarized, was nominated for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male, but lost. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>The tender hip-hop ballad from Furious 7 was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Song of the Year to Ed Sheeran’s “Thinking Out Loud”; Best Pop Duo/Group Performance to the Mark Ronson/Bruno Mars collabo “Uptown Funk!”; and Best Song Written for Visual Media to “Glory” from Selma. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“See You Again,” Wiz Khalifa feat. Charlie Puth (12 weeks at No. 1 in 2015)

The tender hip-hop ballad from Furious 7 was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Song of the Year to Ed Sheeran’s “Thinking Out Loud”; Best Pop Duo/Group Performance to the Mark Ronson/Bruno Mars collabo “Uptown Funk!”; and Best Song Written for Visual Media to “Glory” from Selma. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This pretty ballad wasn’t nominated for a Grammy, though the album from which it was taken, Bedtime Stories, was nominated for Best Pop Album. (It lost to Joni Mitchell’s Turbulent Indigo.) The Grammys were slow to embrace Madonna. The star, who landed her first big hit in 1984, won her first Grammy for a 1991 music video. She didn’t win her first Grammy for a recording until 1998. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Take a Bow,” Madonna (seven weeks at No. 1 in 1995)

This pretty ballad wasn’t nominated for a Grammy, though the album from which it was taken, Bedtime Stories, was nominated for Best Pop Album. (It lost to Joni Mitchell’s Turbulent Indigo.) The Grammys were slow to embrace Madonna. The star, who landed her first big hit in 1984, won her first Grammy for a 1991 music video. She didn’t win her first Grammy for a recording until 1998. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>The rock classic, one of the biggest rock hits by a female-fronted band, wasn’t nominated for any Grammys. Jett may love rock ‘n’ roll, but back then Grammy voters weren’t sure how they felt about it. This recording (a remake of a 1975 hit by the Arrows) was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame last year. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll,” Joan Jett & The Blackhearts (seven weeks at No. 1 in 1982)

The rock classic, one of the biggest rock hits by a female-fronted band, wasn’t nominated for any Grammys. Jett may love rock ‘n’ roll, but back then Grammy voters weren’t sure how they felt about it. This recording (a remake of a 1975 hit by the Arrows) was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame last year. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>Gaye’s classic remake of a Gladys Knight & The Pips hit from the previous year was nominated for Best Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance — Male, but lost to Otis Redding’s equally classic “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay.” (Both recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.) Gaye finally won his first Grammy for 1982’s “Sexual Healing.” Note: Knight & The Pips’ version of “Grapevine” was nominated the previous year, but also lost. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” Marvin Gaye (seven weeks at No. 1 in 1968-69)

Gaye’s classic remake of a Gladys Knight & The Pips hit from the previous year was nominated for Best Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance — Male, but lost to Otis Redding’s equally classic “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay.” (Both recordings have been voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.) Gaye finally won his first Grammy for 1982’s “Sexual Healing.” Note: Knight & The Pips’ version of “Grapevine” was nominated the previous year, but also lost. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This smash hit, produced/co-written by Giorgio Moroder and fusing elements of pop, rock, and disco, was featured in the Richard Gere movie American Gigolo. It was nominated for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but lost to Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band’s album Against the Wind. (In those days, albums and singles sometimes competed against each other.) (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Call Me,” Blondie (six weeks at No. 1 in 1980)

This smash hit, produced/co-written by Giorgio Moroder and fusing elements of pop, rock, and disco, was featured in the Richard Gere movie American Gigolo. It was nominated for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but lost to Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band’s album Against the Wind. (In those days, albums and singles sometimes competed against each other.) (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This rock classic wasn’t even nominated for a Grammy. Stewart finally won his first (and to date, only) Grammy for his 2004 album Stardust…The Great American Songbook Volume III. Unfortunately, that collection isn’t one-20th the classic that “Maggie May” is. “Maggie May” was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame this year. </p>
“Maggie May,” Rod Stewart (five weeks at No. 1 in 1971)

This rock classic wasn’t even nominated for a Grammy. Stewart finally won his first (and to date, only) Grammy for his 2004 album Stardust…The Great American Songbook Volume III. Unfortunately, that collection isn’t one-20th the classic that “Maggie May” is. “Maggie May” was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame this year.

<p>This hip-swiveling Latin/pop smash received three Grammy nominations. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Santana/Rob Thomas collabo “Smooth.” It lost Best Male Pop Vocal Performance to the title song from Sting’s Brand New Day album. (In addition, Martin’s eponymous album lost Best Pop Album to Sting’s album.) (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Livin’ La Vida Loca,” Ricky Martin (five weeks at No. 1 in 1999)

This hip-swiveling Latin/pop smash received three Grammy nominations. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Santana/Rob Thomas collabo “Smooth.” It lost Best Male Pop Vocal Performance to the title song from Sting’s Brand New Day album. (In addition, Martin’s eponymous album lost Best Pop Album to Sting’s album.) (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This smash from Charlie’s Angels was nominated for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television, or Other Visual Media, but lost to Randy Newman’s “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2. But don’t feel too bad for Destiny’s Child. Another of their hits, “Say My Name,” won two Grammys that year: Best R&B Song and Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Independent Women Part I,” Destiny’s Child (11 weeks at No. 1 in 2000-01)

This smash from Charlie’s Angels was nominated for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television, or Other Visual Media, but lost to Randy Newman’s “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2. But don’t feel too bad for Destiny’s Child. Another of their hits, “Say My Name,” won two Grammys that year: Best R&B Song and Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This classic, which blended new wave and pop/rock, was nominated for Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group, but lost to the Eagles’ “Heartache Tonight.” The Knack were also nominated for Best New Artist, but lost to Rickie Lee Jones. (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“My Sharona,” The Knack (six weeks at No. 1 in 1979)

This classic, which blended new wave and pop/rock, was nominated for Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group, but lost to the Eagles’ “Heartache Tonight.” The Knack were also nominated for Best New Artist, but lost to Rickie Lee Jones. (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This effervescent teen-pop smash was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Song of the Year to “We Are Young,” which had been a huge hit for fun. It lost Best Pop Solo Performance to Adele’s “Set Fire to the Rain (Live).” (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Call Me Maybe,” Carly Rae Jepsen (nine weeks at No. 1 in 2012)

This effervescent teen-pop smash was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Song of the Year to “We Are Young,” which had been a huge hit for fun. It lost Best Pop Solo Performance to Adele’s “Set Fire to the Rain (Live).” (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This giant hit, which was written by Neil Diamond, was nominated for two Grammys — Best Performance by a Vocal Group and Best Contemporary Group Performance (Vocal or Instrumental). It lost both awards to the 5th Dimension’s ebullient “Up — Up and Away.” (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“I’m a Believer,” The Monkees (seven weeks at No. 1 in 1966-67)

This giant hit, which was written by Neil Diamond, was nominated for two Grammys — Best Performance by a Vocal Group and Best Contemporary Group Performance (Vocal or Instrumental). It lost both awards to the 5th Dimension’s ebullient “Up — Up and Away.” (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This exuberant smash was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Carole King’s “It’s Too Late.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group, or Chorus to the Carpenters’ hit-studded self-titled album. (That was the album that included “Superstar,” “Rainy Days and Mondays,” and “For All We Know.”) (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Joy to the World” Three Dog Night (six weeks at No. 1 in 1971)

This exuberant smash was nominated for two Grammys. It lost Record of the Year to Carole King’s “It’s Too Late.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group, or Chorus to the Carpenters’ hit-studded self-titled album. (That was the album that included “Superstar,” “Rainy Days and Mondays,” and “For All We Know.”) (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>Rogers’s smash (which was written by Lionel Richie) was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to Christopher Cross’s “Sailing.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male to Kenny Loggins’s “This Is It.” (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Lady,” Kenny Rogers (six weeks at No. 1 in 1980)

Rogers’s smash (which was written by Lionel Richie) was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to Christopher Cross’s “Sailing.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male to Kenny Loggins’s “This Is It.” (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This tender, introspective ballad, in which the lead character contemplated suicide, was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Roberta Flack smash “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male to Nilsson’s “Without You.” (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Alone Again (Naturally),” Gilbert O’Sullivan (six weeks at No. 1 in 1972)

This tender, introspective ballad, in which the lead character contemplated suicide, was nominated for three Grammys. It lost Record and Song of the Year to the Roberta Flack smash “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.” It lost Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male to Nilsson’s “Without You.” (Photo: Getty Images)

<p>This hip-hop smash received two Grammy nominations. It lost Best Rap/Sung Collaboration to the Estelle/Kanye West collabo “American Boy.” It lost Best Rap Song to Lil Wayne’s “Lollipop.” (“Low” also describes how Flo Rida and T-Pain probably felt on Grammy night.) (Photo: Getty Images) </p>
“Low,” Flo Rida feat. T-Pain (10 weeks at No. 1 in 2007-08)

This hip-hop smash received two Grammy nominations. It lost Best Rap/Sung Collaboration to the Estelle/Kanye West collabo “American Boy.” It lost Best Rap Song to Lil Wayne’s “Lollipop.” (“Low” also describes how Flo Rida and T-Pain probably felt on Grammy night.) (Photo: Getty Images)

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