2021 NBA Draft: How Arkansas' Moses Moody fits Warriors, Kings

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How NBA draft prospect Moody fits both Warriors and Kings originally appeared on NBC Sports Bayarea

  • This is the second installment of a series breaking down the potential selections for both the Kings and Warriors in the 2021 NBA Draft.

So many options, so little time to mull them over. 

Both the Warriors and Kings are primed to add talent in the upcoming 2021 NBA Draft. This is a top-heavy draft, but there still are plenty of prospects available where the Warriors select at No. 7 and No. 14 and the Kings choose at No.9.

These two teams are studying the same basic talent pool and they can impact each other’s drafts dramatically. 

After breaking down Florida State’s Scottie Barnes earlier in the week, Arkansas freshman Moses Moody is on the docket. Moody is scheduled to go anywhere from No. 7 to No. 14 in the draft. This is prime Warriors and Kings range.

Stats

Stats: 16.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, 1.6 assists, 1.0 steals, 42.7% FG, 35.8% 3-point FG

Age: 19 Height: 6-foot-6 Weight: 211 Wingspan: 7-foot-0.75

Moody is one of the better 3-and-D wing prospects in this year’s draft class. He measured in at 6-foot-4.5 without shoes, giving him a more than a nine-inch height to wingspan ratio. 

At the NBA level, he has the size and length to play either the two or the three and he has a frame that can take on additional muscle.

In his single season at the NCAA level, Moody scored 20 or more points in nine out of 32 games. He also posted double-digit scoring in all but four games. He also managed a single double-double (points, rebounds) and a total of eight games with eight or more rebounds. 

Strengths

Moody is versatile and made for the modern NBA switching game. He can defend the two or three with his incredible length and he plays a physical game that should allow him to get on the floor in Year 1.

In college, Moody was asked to act as a primary scorer, which worked at times. He averaged nearly 17 points per game and projects as a solid third or fourth option as an NBA player, with some upside.

Moody shot 35.8 percent from 3-point range on 5.1 attempts per game. He’s very solid as a catch-and-shoot sniper from the perimeter and should see his percentages rise when he isn’t the primary focal point on the offensive end. He needs to work on his off-the-ball instincts, but he has the ability to score at all three levels.

Playing as an 18-year-old for most of his freshman campaign, Moody had no issues mixing it up in the post and he played through contact. Moody averaged 5.8 free throw attempts per game and knocked down 81.2 percent on those opportunities. 

In addition to his scoring ability, Moody rebounds at a high rate for a wing. He averaged 5.8 rebounds per game and posted solid offensive and defensive rebound percentages for a guard. He’ll need to get stronger to continue this trend at the NBA level, but he has nice instincts.

Overall, Moody has a decently high ceiling, but also a high floor as a prospect. He’s a multi-positional defender with solid instincts and a nice perimeter shot. He’s more of a role player, but there is a chance he shines when the spacing improves.

Weaknesses

While Moody has good size and length, he isn’t particularly explosive. He needs to work on his first step and get stronger overall to give himself a chance to be more than a catch-and-shoot floor spacer at the next level.

Moody’s shot selection wasn’t always the best in his freshman season, which played a big part in his overall 42.7 percent field goal percentage. He can score at all three levels, but he needs to clean up some of the inconsistent play.

Moody was asked to carry the scoring load and not create for others. He averaged just 1.6 assists and 1.6 turnovers in nearly 34 minutes per game. The turnover number isn’t bad, but he could be asked to do more for his teammates in the pros. 

On the defensive end, Moody will need to continue to bulk up, especially if he is going to spend a lot of time at the three. He also needs to improve his steal numbers. For a player with his length and athleticism, he should be able to move above a steal per game. 

Fit with Warriors

Golden State wants to win now. They will aggressively try to move on from the No. 7 pick, but if they stay at this spot, Moody will at least draw consideration, especially with both Kelly Oubre and Kent Bazemore set to hit the free-agent market.

Moody’s ability to play both the two and three would give Steve Kerr plenty of options, especially if the Warriors have to limit Klay Thompson’s minutes early in the year.

RELATED: Warriors' ideal combinations for No. 7, No. 14 draft picks

The Warriors would like an NBA-ready player, but Moody fits their system long term. He has nice length, can shoot the 3-ball and his ability to defend multiple positions would help take some of the stress off of both Thompson and Steph Curry.

He might not have the ceiling of some of the other players at this spot in the draft, but Moody also has a very high floor. He looks like a player who can stick in the rotation for years and provide depth at key positions. There also is a chance he takes another big leap as a player as he develops as a pro.

Fit with Kings

General manager Monte McNair chased Derrick Jones Jr. in free agency, signed Glenn Robinson III and traded for Moe Harkless at the deadline. He wants a long defender at the three and Moody fits the bill.

If the Kings stick at No. 9, this is the type of player they will look for. He might be a better fit than any of the options expected to be available at this point in the draft.

RELATED: Haliburton mentoring Williams during NBA draft process

While he might not be a starter on Day 1, there is hope that Moody could step in and at least play rotational minutes in his rookie campaign. That would allow Harrison Barnes to shift to the four for longer stretches. 

At 19 years old, Moody will need time to develop, but there is a path for him to be a long-term fixture at the wing in Sacramento alongside the backcourt of De’Aaron Fox and Tyrese Haliburton.

Player Comparison

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