100 ways women can make Olympic and Paralympic history (No. 51-60)

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As part of the countdown to the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, On Her Turf is compiling a list of 100 ways women can make history at this summer’s Games. This is the fifth post in the series. If you missed the first four, you can find them here:

No.61-70 | No.71-80 | No. 81-90 | No. 91-100

#60: Skateboarding’s Olympic debut is likely to feature several very young athletes, including Great Britain’s Sky Brown, who turns 13 in July. The Japanese-born skater finished second in women’s park at the Dew Tour over the weekend. (Note: On Monday, Kyodo Times reported that 12-year-old Hiraki Kokona of Japan also qualified for the Tokyo Olympics in women’s park.)

RELATED: Young female athletes who could make history at the Tokyo Olympics

#59: In track & field, the U.S. hasn’t won Olympic gold in the women’s 800m since 1968, but that drought could end in Tokyo. In addition to teenager Athing Mu – who owns the fastest time of 2021 as a freshman at Texas A&M – Americans Raevyn Rogers and Ajee Wilson both finished on the podium at the 2019 World Championships.

#58: Transgender women have been eligible to compete at the Olympics since the 2004 Athens Games, but at this summer’s Tokyo Olympics, New Zealand weightlifter Laurel Hubbard could become the first.

RELATED: The real threat to women’s sports? It’s not trans women

#57: New Zealand sprint canoeist Lisa Carrington is perhaps the most dominant Olympian in the world right now. Since 2012, she has gone undefeated in the K-1 200m (a streak that includes two Olympic gold medals and six world titles). In Tokyo, Carrington will look to win her first Olympic gold in the K-1 500m.

#56: After winning four medals (including three gold) at the 2016 Rio Paralympics, McKenzie Coan is expected to contend for multiple gold medals in Tokyo. At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Coan set up her own “personal aquatic center” in her family’s garage.

#55: At age 24, Simone Biles could become the oldest female gymnast to win the Olympic all-around title since Czech gymnast Vera Caslavska, then 26, won in 1968. Over the weekend, Biles competed for the first time since 2019, winning the all-around title (and landing a historic vault) at the 2021 U.S. Classic (video embedded above).

VIDEO: Every replay of Simone Biles’ Yurchenko double pike vault

#54: China will look to keep its perfect streak in women’s table tennis. A Chinese woman has won Olympic gold at every Games since women’s singles debuted in 1988 (eight straight gold medals).

#53: The U.S. women’s weightlifting team owns one Olympic gold medal (earned in 2000). That drought could end in Tokyo. Since Rio, Americans Kate Nye (76kg) and Sarah Robles (+87kg) both won world championship titles – the first Americans to do so since 1994.

#52: BMX cyclist Mariana Pajon already owns the honor of being Colombia’s only two-time Olympic gold medalist in any sport. The 29-year-old will be looking to win a third straight Olympic title in Tokyo.

#51: After winning gold in golf’s Olympic return in 2016, South Korea’s Inbee Park will look to defend her Olympic title in Tokyo.

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100 ways women can make Olympic and Paralympic history (No. 51-60) originally appeared on NBCSports.com