Brittany Rayburn

#25PG,
Height: 6' 0"
Born:
College: Purdue
Birth Place: Attica, Indiana
  • Sox' lack of homegrown starters an understandable problem to Yanks' Cashman
    CSNNE.com

    Sox' lack of homegrown starters an understandable problem to Yanks' Cashman

    The Adam Jones-Yadier Molina verbal skirmish is as predictable as it is annoying. Was every cultural nuance for the 16 World Baseball Classic teams explained in a booklet the players had to memorize before the tournament? No? Then it’s amazing there weren’t more moments like this. Jones, the Orioles outfielder, said Team USA's championship game win over Puerto Rico was motivated by Puerto Rico's choice to plan a post-tournament parade for the team before the final game. As Jones was raised, parades in pro sports are for championship teams. Red Sox fans are likely aware of this. As Jones was raised, discussing a parade before a title is secured suggests overconfidence. Rex Ryan fans are likely

  • What's being said, written and tweeted about Cowboys LB Jaylon Smith
    SportsDay

    What's being said, written and tweeted about Cowboys LB Jaylon Smith

    If a report by CBS Sports' Dennis Dodd is correct, Cowboys linebacker Jaylon Smith, a second-round pick in the 2016 NFL draft, has a nice payday ($700,000) coming his way because of a payout from his loss-of-draft-value insurance policy. Smith had surgery early last year to reconstruct his left anterior cruciate ligament after injuring his knee in Notre Dame's bowl game in the 2015 season. The injury was enough for Smith to fall to the Cowboys in the second round of last year's NFL draft (34th overall pick). Though he's not fully recovered, Smith says the nerves are beginning to fire in his knee and that he's 'gonna ball this year.' The Cowboys are counting on him to be a contributor in 2017. 

  • A lasting legacy: Medlen's death spurred NHRA safety gains
    USA Today

    A lasting legacy: Medlen's death spurred NHRA safety gains

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — John Medlen remembers his son's final seconds like they were his first steps. Eric Medlen inched his dragster to the starting line and waited for the signal. John, also his son's crew chief, made a couple of routine checks, looked in Eric's eyes, gave him a thumbs-up and pounded on the hood twice. "Neither one of us realized he had a little less than three seconds to live," John said. Ten years after Eric's fatal practice run at Gainesville Raceway, home to one of professional drag racing's premier events, John is still dealing with the demons that come from burying a child. Eric's death became a defining moment for NHRA, mostly because of the way John reacted to it and