Shutdown Corner - NFL

Tony Romo recently treated a homeless man to an afternoon at the movies, according to the Dallas Morning News. The man, who simply goes by Doc, told the paper that Romo offered to buy him a ticket to a film, but Doc declined so he could make some money passing out fliers instead. It wasn't until Doc confirmed the fact that the ticket offer came from Romo that he accepted the offer, meeting Romo and his friend (not Jessica Simpson, because you know there's no way she'd have let Romo invite a homeless guy to the movies) inside the theater after the movie had started. They saw Role Models, which, despite the title, is not a biography of the 1990s Cowboys.

This is the second such 'Romo as good samaritan' story to come out in recent months. On the night of the Cowboys' season opener, Romo reportedly stopped to help change the tire of a couple stranded in a parking lot.

They're both nice stories, and I'm sure Romo is a good guy (albeit one with questionable taste in headwear). But what I'd like to know is, who's feeding these stories about Romo's good deeds to the press? It's not unreasonable, I guess, to believe that the couple with the blown tire called up the newspaper to report a selfless act being done by the city's most famous athlete. But what about Doc, the homeless man? In general, I'd assume that media outlets don't run with every story suggested to them by random homeless men. If they did, our papers would be overrun with articles about the end being near. So who fed this tale to the press? 

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