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Friends and Family: Draft Q&A

Matt Buser
Yahoo Sports

The fantasy hoops edition of the Yahoo! Friends and Family League held its draft last week in anticipation of the 2008-09 season. The major changes for this installment of the F&F league is the move from roto and daily roster moves to h2h and weekly rosters. The Fantasy Basketball Cafe's Jonathan Tom is in everyone's crosshairs, as exceptional team management – highlighted by a pair of strong trades at the deadline – propelled him to a very comfortable win last season.

You can view the full results of the draft here. Each of the participants were sent three questions regarding the draft, and their answers can be found below. My team was omitted from this process, however – instead, there's been much discussion of my team (and others) here.

RotoWire – Chris Liss
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: I still try to draft the best player available and take what the draft gives me. I also try to be strong in the percentage categories because that gives you a leg up both on teams that go big or small. I think I did well overall, though I'll be thin with the small bench, given Monta Ellis and Manu Ginobili's injuries. I also think you can absorb injuries better in head-to-head, so gambling on players who might miss 20-30 games makes more sense.

Q: You took a pair of PG at the turn for Rounds 8-9, drafting Monta Ellis and Mike Conley back-to-back. Both are intriguing picks, but for different reasons – what are your expectations for Ellis as he works his way back from a major injury, and what kind of leap are you anticipating for Conley in his sophomore season?

A: Ellis was a monster last year in roto leagues, and with Baron Davis gone, he could take on an even bigger role – assuming he ever gets healthy. I'm not a medical expert, but he's supposed to be back in 30 games, so I thought it was worth gambling on his upside. Conley played well at the tail end of last year, and he could log good minutes on a young Memphis squad. He's a major prospect, and it often takes point guards a year or so to adjust to the NBA, so I think he was worth the gamble there, too. I'm agnostic about most un-established players – really don't know what they'll do. But drafting is all about optionality – positioning yourself to cash in big should certain players break out.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: I thought Ramon Sessions in Round 10 was a pretty good pick – I had plenty of PGs at that point, but he's got major upside. I thought Ron Artest in Round 3 was too early – he's fitting into a team with other options, and he's injury prone as well. I would certainly have taken Kevin Durant (the next pick) or Joe Johnson over him.

82games.com – Roland Beech
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: H2H, where each week you just get a W or a L, is very different to me since there you want to dominate, say, six of nine cats and you can throw away the other three to some extent. Likewise FT% being more volatile in a given week doesn't scare me off the bad FT guys so much (although lots of folks in this draft seemed to have that mindset as Dwight Howard, etc were going fast). If the H2H just adds up all the cats each week so you go 5-3-1 in a given week etc., then it's not as different since being bad in FT will still cost you plenty over the course of a season. But, again, the volatility means you are not a dead duck in a given week.

As I mainly play non-TO leagues I have to adjust a fair amount for when turnovers are in play. I did like my team in the end and feel good about what I have. It's always interesting to me how guys like Richard Hamilton and Tayshaun Prince hang around well beyond their "stats worth." One thing I like is guys who you know are going to play minutes rather than 'potential' and if you get enough studs early on, having steady contributors in later rounds is better than flyers on upside types.

Q: Marcus Camby had arguably his finest season at age 33, posting career-highs in games played (79), rebounds (13.1), blocks (3.6), and assists (3.3), and finishing fourth in the Yahoo! rankings. He's now with a new team and will man the PF spot, a position he hasn't played regularly since the late 90's. What are you expectations for Camby in his new digs?

A: Yes, Marcus is a little risky. Injuries have been less of an issue after years when he was written off like Yao as a sure thing to miss a bunch of games. I don't mind the PF move so much but I don't like the Clippers, since by all accounts they are thrifty on things like training facilities and the like. I expect Camby to still do fine in blocks and rebounds and see a tad uplift perhaps in FG% with a few extra feeds from Baron.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: Well there were a few picks that raised eyebrows. As I recall Salmons went a little early. He has had good games and stretches but again it's based on upside rather than proven production. Yao went a little early since I do genuinely feel he will miss games. Mike Bibby went early.

RotoWire – Andre' Snellings
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: My draft strategy is flexible, depending on my draft slot and who is available with my first few picks. Generally, I take best available talent for the first three rounds, then use that as the foundation for my team. In this draft, my first few picks were LeBron, Yao, and Duncan. Thus, my team's identity was established as strong in big man categories and scoring. After that, I spent the rest of the draft a) supplementing my strong categories enough to guarantee I could win those every week and b) trying to fill in the weak spots enough that those aren't definite losses.

Q: You've got two big-time players on your squad over whom the specter of injury either hangs (Yao Ming) or has already manifested itself this season (Gilbert Arenas). What is your over/under for games played totals for each of the players, and are you expecting "the Arenas of old" when Agent Zero does get back into the lineup this season?

A: I'm expecting 60 games out of Yao and about 30 out of Arenas, my hope is just that they play some of those games during the playoffs. Arenas is a pure wild card … I don't think I'd have drafted him in a rotisserie league, but since it is head-to-head, if he gets healthy by the end of the year he could be an added first round value. I don't know that he'll ever average 30/10 this season, like he has for stretches in the past, but even if he is more 25 points/6 assists/3 treys, that'd still be a big boost down the stretch.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: Across the league, I think that Baron Davis, Jose Calderon, Yao, Camby, and Nash are the biggest threats to disappoint. Davis and Camby always have injury concerns, and both are in new situations that may not fit their talents as well as their old teams did. Yao, from my team, is almost a lock to miss 20-plus games, I'm just rolling the dice that he misses them in the middle of the year and can make it back for the fantasy playoffs. And Calderon and Nash are at two ends of the totem pole … Calderon is just a little unproven to go in the seconnd round, while Nash is showing signs that his statistical dominance could be slowing down a bit.

On the flip side, I think that Salmons, Ford, and Jermaine O'Neal could be value in the seventh round. I also like Mayo, Rondo, Parker and Arenas in the eighth and Sessions as a deeper "sleeper" in the 10th. Sessions is interesting because everyone has him on their sleeper list, so he risks being over-rated. He may not produce at all out of the gates, but he could be producing double-digit assists by the end of the season. Also, like Smith at the end of the 11th and Kleiza at the end of the 12th.

RotoExperts – Hector Castro and Tommy Landry
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: Our draft strategy for our first three rounds was simple – get the best players on the board. We were able to nab Kobe, Melo, and Jose Calderon who we had as three of the RotoExperts' Top 20 players. For rounds four through seven, our strategy was just getting back online as we were disconnected and had difficulty logging back on. After finally getting back on, the computer took care of our Center positions with Sheed, Kaman, and Brad Miller. At that point, we continued to draft the best player available.

Q: You drafted a pair of PG on the low side of their current ADP numbers in Jose Calderon (pick 21, current ADP 28) and Chris Quinn (pick 93, current ADP 141 in 2 percent of leagues). Please explain the thought processes that led to these two picks.

A: We are projecting big things for Calderon this year as he is the man leading the Raptors offense. He broke out last year as an assist machine. We expect even more out of Calderon this season as the stars have aligned for him. We were extremely happy he was there for us so we can lock up a top PG to anchor our roster.

My Co-owner Tommy Landry has started the Chris Quinn hype machine and the rest of the RotoExperts have jumped board. We feel that Chris is going to get plenty of PT in Miami dishing dimes to studs like Dwyane Wade, Michael Beasley, and Shawn Marion. Quinn showed last year, with weaker options to work with, that he can produce solid numbers with the opportunity. Most people keep pointing out PG Marcus Banks or rookie Mario Chalmers as the possible starter. But Chalmers is more of a shooting guard then anything. And Marcus Banks is well … Marcus Banks. There is a reason why Banks has been on four different NBA teams in his five pro years. We averaged Quinn going as early as the eighth round in ADP so we opted to draft him there and not risk losing him to another squad later in the draft. In our opinion, Quinn has a higher value then your average eighth rounder by possibly producing third- or fourth-round numbers.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: There are several players that are high risk/high reward players this year. Marcus Camby is one player that I was trying to stay away from this year. Not that he is a bad player or anything like that, but he is a very fragile player who can really put a hurting to your fantasy team if he was to go down after spending a second-round pick for him.

Fantasy Basketball Caf – Jonathan Tom
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: Typically, I like to draft H2H teams to be competitive in eight cats. I like to put less emphasis on the value of TOs and percentages as week to week those categories can be extremely volatile. I also have always strongly advocated staying away from rookies on draft day.

In this draft however, I chose to have a little fun with it and defer from my usual tendencies. I chose to completely punt the FT% and TO categories. I also drafted a handful of high-risk, high-reward players such as Dwyane Wade, Tracy McGrady and Gerald Wallace. In the weeks that that trio manages to stay healthy my team will definitely be a tough out. The problem is just how many of those weeks will I be rewarded with this season? Only time will tell.

As a whole this team will definitely need a bit of tweaking, and as always, a bit of luck if I am going to repeat as the Friends and Family champion. Last season, Matt Buser and I battled at the top of the rankings for several months. In the end, a couple of trades on my end proved to be the difference. This season, I'm going to have to start my trade explorations early (to address my 3PTM deficiency) as I cannot expect to experience any kind of success being competitive in only six cats.

Q: Where's T-Mac? On your squad. Your fifth and sixth round picks (Gerald Wallace and Tracy McGrady) have been known to miss a game or two, and McGrady is already dealing with "some pain" in his knee. I'm assuming this was a calculated risk on your part, but what do you see as best-case and worst-case scenarios for Crash and T-Mac?

A: I'll be honest with you in that I am not too fond of T-Mac's prospects this season. He's already complaining about 'mental' knee pain and is sure to start complaining about his back any day now. On draft day I actually had him and John Salmons in my queue, but for some inexplicable reason I elected to go with the Costco size bottle of aspirin instead. I'm putting T-Mac's best-case scenario at 70 games with increased efficiency (FG%, TO) due to the arrival of Ron Artest. His worst case scenario is something like 50 games, 41 percent shooting, and 2.8 TO.

Gerald Wallace, on the other hand, I feel fairly good about. So far, Larry Brown says he's impressed by Crash's athleticism and defensive prowess. I think Brown's coaching style will actually force G-Wall to refocus on his strengths (FG%, REB, STL, BLK) and not on his weaknesses (3PTM, playmaking). As for his best-case scenario it's feasible that Wallace returns to his 2005-06 form (.500+ FG%, 7+ REB, 2+ STL, 2+ BLK) with about 72 GP. His worst-case scenario would be something like 40 GP, .460 FG%, 6 REB, 1.5 STL, 1 BLK.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: A few players that could prove to be strong values relative to their draft position are John Salmons (7.01), Charlie Villanueva (9.04) and Travis Outlaw (12.04). As for disappointments relative to draft position I'll say Josh Smith (2.01), Kevin Durant (3.12), and Andrew Bogut (4.06).

RotoWire – Justin Phan
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: In head-to-head leagues it is especially important to be able to roll with the punches and adjust your game plan during the draft depending on who does and doesn't fall to you, the strategies of the managers you are drafting with, and any positional or categorical runs you observe. In the words of Michael Scott, "Adapt. React. Re-adapt. Act."

I was very happy with how the draft turned out for me. I implemented the same punt-block strategy built around Dirk Nowitzki in another league I'm competing in so I was pretty familiar with which players I wanted to target at different stages during the draft.

Q: Picks 8-11 were a bit of a mixed bag for you – which of the four players (Francisco Garcia, Kenyon Martin, Hakim Warrick, and Wilson Chandler) do you have the highest hopes for, and how do you expect the group to impact your team overall?

A: I have high expectations for all four of these players going into this season, Garcia and Chandler in particular, and I think they could easily outperform their draft position. Securing a group of players in the first six rounds whom I felt really confident about allowed me to take a few more chances than usual in the mid-rounds to hit on a few breakout players, which is crucial to winning a competitive league like this one.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: Many of the disappointments I'm seeing were made by managers at the turn who knew that they had to reach for a certain player if they wanted him because chances were he wouldn't make it back in 22 picks. Amongst these reaches I'm seeing are Josh Smith (13), Kevin Durant (36), Michael Beasley (48), and LaMarcus Aldridge (49). Bogut (42) was drafted about two rounds too early for my taste. I don't like to harp on a pick past the sixth round because there is usually some sort of upside attached to those players, but Chris Quinn in the eighth round is almost a guarantee to disappoint. And as always, "Where's T-Mac?"

I was pleasantly surprised that Chauncey Billups (30) and Vince Carter (43) were available at their respective draft positions. Andre Iguodala (39) is as solid of a late-3rd round pick as you can ask for and I liked the upshot with Jamal Crawford in the sixth round. Beech made out well with Andris Biedrins (50) as did Klyce with Leandro Barbosa (84).

Rotoworld – Steve Alexander
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: My strategy is to come up with the best group of guys I can get and to diversify positions early, making sure I'm as deep as possible. But generally, I take the best player available with the first couple picks and then start filling in holes. One draft I might take Deron Williams at No. 7 and the next it might be Dwyane Wade or Kevin Garnett, as it was here. I'm a "feel" player in most of my own drafts – And since I had 12-13 of them this year, I like to mix it up to keep things fresh.

Looking back on it, I kind of wish I'd taken Deron Williams at No. 7. He's going to be a turnover machine, but the severity in PG drop-off is extreme after the good ones are gone. But you can say the same about PF, which isn't actually as deep a position as you might think. Garnett was still pretty damn good last year and missed more than 10 games. I'm hoping the missed games disappear and he goes back to being a rock star, even if he's now playing smaller venues.

I then snagged Baron Davis in Round 2, locking up my starting PF and PG early. Everyone seems to be down on Baron and I would not be surprised to see the mess that is the Clippers quickly bring him to his knees, but I stuck to my rankings on this one. He has a bad rap, but when he plays, he is a very dominant fantasy player. And don't forget he played in 82 games last year.

Got my SG with Jason Richardson (although I'm scared to death of most players coached by my arch nemesis, Larry Brown), a center I like in Andrew Bogut and the best small forward on the board in Josh Howard in Round 5. I really wanted to draft Stephen Jackson there, but thought he might fall to me. Nope, he was snagged with the next pick by Romig.

I then grabbed Richard Jefferson, who I thought fell way to far, and then tried to secure my backup PF/C in one shot with Okafor, who I think is going to be a solid player this year. I then threw away the sheet and loaded up the queue with "my guys" and started swinging for the fences with sleepers, which I have been doing a lot of lately – Stuckey, Marvin, Rudy F, Barnes, Bargnani (who suddenly looks pretty decent and qualifies at C), and Simmons. Probably a risky strategy, but I am at least happy with the depth and potential upside of the team.

Q: You drafted Rodney Stuckey 50 picks before his current ADP (pick 90, ADP 140) and landed fan-favorite Rudy Fernandez in the 10th round (pick 114). What expectations do you have for these two young guards?

A: As for Stuckey and Rudy going so far before their ADP, I got them close to where I had them ranked. Either I'm way too high on them or the users are sleeping on them. But some of that ADP info happened before Stuckey was virtually guaranteed starter's minutes and Martell Webster went under the knife. But really, the bottom line here is that those were guys I wanted and I felt that if I didn't snag them then (or close to then) they weren't going to be there when it came back to me. And honestly, in normal-sized leagues, the waiver talent is deep enough that many draft mistakes can be quickly fixed if you act early. I basically try to stick to the list in the first 6-7 rounds and then tend to go after the guys I really like and think have the most upside to finish up the draft.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: For disappointments, I think we're asking a lot of Wade this year. He could stay healthy, but I am not sure the odds are in his favor. I also have no interest in drafting Arenas, Manu, Monta Ellis, Odom or Kirilenko this year. The injured guys are dealing with some serious injuries, while the other two are going to be sixth men for the first time ever.

The same round I took Stuckey, Liss rolled the dice on Monta, who might not even play a game this year. RotoExperts took Chris Quinn that round, while Andre Snellings took Arenas. Comparing a healthy and upcoming Stuckey for a whole season with "Chris Quinn" and guys with one leg? Not even close in my book.

Biggest return on investment? I do quite like my Bob Simmons last-rounder, but I love James Posey with the last pick of the draft for Klyce. Mo Pete is playing in front of him? Are you kidding? I also think Iguodala late in Round 3 is easy money.

Yahoo! – Matt Romig
Romig: I think it was noted lawman Axel Foley who once said, "I'm on vacation!" Plush fairways and blended drinks beckoned, so I had to turn my draft over to Jeff Murison, a behind-the-scenes guy with Yahoo! fantasy and the commish of my keeper league. Jeff's answers follow, with my comments in parenthesis, where needed.

Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: The strategy I apply to my drafts is to select the best available player on my draft board. That being said, in H2H leagues I don't mind drafting players with high shot and turnover volumes. These players tend to be the focal point of their team's offense and will fill up the box scores. Therefore, I'll rank these players a bit higher in H2H versus Roto. You can punt a category or two (like turnovers) in the H2H format.

In this particular draft I landed two C-eligible players (Brand and Gasol) in Rounds 1 and 2 as they were the highest-ranked players on my board. This allowed me to target other high ranked players on my board (Pierce, Roy and S-Jack) as the draft progressed. I was then able to land Oden, who I think will have a monster year, in the sixth.

(Jeff ignored specific instructions to secure Marco Belinelli in Rounds 1-4. Otherwise, well done.)

Q: You came away from the draft with two young bigs of note in Greg Oden and Andray Blatche. What kind of stat-line are you expecting from the early ROY favorite in Oden, and are you anticipating something of a breakout season from Blatche with Brendan Haywood on the shelf?

A: I expect something like the following from Mr. Oden this season: .580 FG% – .700 FT% – 15 PTS – 10 REB – 2 AST – 2.5 BLK – 0.5 ST – 2 TO. With this being a weekly lineup changes league, Blatche was a luxury pick for me. He did have some breakout games in 07-08 when he started, such as the Feb. 1 start against the Jazz: 40 min – 19 PTS – 13 REB – 2 AST – 3S T – 4 BLK – 5 TO. Best Case Scenario: He puts up numbers like this all season and equals Camby in production. Worst Case Scenario: He isn't able to keep the starting gig in DC and can only be relied on for blocks on a weekly basis.

(Nice flyer on Blatche. I think Oden's projections are a little aggressive, but I'm happy he's on board.)

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: I really like the Kenyon Martin pick by Phan with the sixth pick of Round 9. Denver is going to run and gun this year, which suits Kenyon's game perfectly. The only way this pick isn't an absolute steal is if Martin gets hurt. I'd rather take a gamble on a healthy Kenyon than injured players, such as Arenas and Ellis, who were drafted a round earlier.

Yahoo! – Brandon Funston
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: Although I recognize punting categories is a viable h2h strategy, I'm not completely comfortable going whole hog in that direction. Instead, I concentrated on getting guys that could push category leaders while being a little cognizant to not compile too many deficiencies in the same area. My main regret was not taking better care of my Center spot, pairing Chris Bosh with Joakim Noah and Brook Lopez. I really wanted to get Kevin Love and/or Nene Hialrio late, but they went six spots and one spot, respectively, ahead of where I'd hoped to get them.

Q: While it's arguable that Marcus Williams and Brook Lopez have the edge in talent in their respective battles for significant roles, neither is a sure thing at this point. What is your over/under on these two locking down starting roles and producing solid fantasy lines in fairly short order?

A: I'm just playing the speculation game with Williams and Lopez, drafting them for upside. They are both in situations where they have the talent to win a starting job. Williams posted very nice fantasy numbers as a starter with New Jersey (11 points, 6 assists, 2 treys, 1 steal) and he has an undrafted rookie (DeMarcus Nelson) and an undrafted second-year player (C.J. Watson) to beat out. The Warriors gave up a future first rounder for Williams and I think his preseason bench role and the pointed comments he's been receiving from coach Don Nelson are just typical psychological warfare from Nelson. If Williams really looks buried in the doghouse a couple weeks into the season, I'll just dump him and move on.

As for Lopez, he's a physical, offensively-skilled 7-footer, a top 10 draft pick that has only Josh Boone and Stromile Swift to contend with at the New Jersey center position. As a 12th-round pick, there was really no downside to the selection, especially considering what was left at the Center position at the time of the pick.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: Considering he's missed at least 25 games in each of the past three seasons, I would not have been willing to use a top 25 pick on Yao Ming as Andre' did (No. 22). Since he also landed PFC Tim Duncan five picks later, I would have opted against gambling so heavily on Yao there. Conversely, Jermaine O'Neal was discounted pretty heavily for his injury history (No. 83 overall). But if he can log at least 70 games in that Phoenix East offense in Toronto, it's going to be a major score for RotoExperts.com to get a C-eligible talent like O'Neal that late in the draft.

RotoExperts – Jonathan Huang
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: In general my strategy has been not to be too balanced. I've made the mistake before of trying to cover too many categories, only to see my team destroyed by opponents who focused on cats. So in this draft, I decided to put a focus on the guard cats (PTS, AST, STL, 3PTM and FT%), while also trying to be solid in rebounds. I punted to an extent BLK, TO and FG%. Early on, I drafted a trio of forwards that fit this strategy – Granger, Artest, Mike Miller. I also grabbed bigs that didn't block a ton of shots but were instead solid FT shooters – Troy Murphy, David West and Jermaine O'Neal. Overall, I feel like it was a solid effort.

Q: Jermaine O'Neal is five seasons removed from elite-level production over a full season, but is a potential X-factor when you consider that you were able to draft him with the 83rd pick. Do you foresee resurgence for O'Neal in his 13th season, playing alongside a talented player like Chris Bosh?

A: I'm sure we all agree that preseason isn't always a great indicator of what players will be like when the games start counting. However, from what I've seen of these early Raptors games, the Jermaine O'Neal-Chris Bosh pairing has looked good. O'Neal has been the one banging on the inside, freeing Bosh to float on the perimeter. Jermaine O'Neal won't be the elite fantasy big man he was years ago, but he'll definitely be bouncing back and putting up solid numbers this season.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: Most disappointing player(s) relative to draft position: Michael Beasley (4th round), Chris Quinn (8th). Largest return on investment relative to draft position: Thaddeus Young (11th), Luol Deng (6th), Jermaine O'Neal (7th).

HoopsKLYCE.com – David Klyce
Q: Do you have a draft strategy that you apply, in general, to head-to-head leagues? If so, what is it and how successful were you in implementing it for this draft? If not, what was your approach for this specific draft, and how do you gauge your overall success?

A: I typically do not target particular categories that I will "throw" as a result of just needing to win a majority of categories to win a matchup. I want to have a chance in any given matchup to win any category. Similarly, I do not try to become invincible in certain categories. I do not want to find the best player available later in the draft does not fit this type of strategy set up earlier in the draft particularly when that player may be a steal in my eyes.

Q: You drafted a trio of talented second-year players. Do you expect Kevin Durant to enter elite territory in his second season? And what are your sophomore predictions for Al Horford and Jeff Green?

A: I do not expect Durant to enter elite territory nor did the other managers otherwise he would not have lasted to the end of the third round. However, I think he has that potential – realistically he is a year off. On a given week we may be elite which is nice in a head to head format.

I am counting of Al Horford to be a reliable double-double guy and be a rock at the center position – a solid middle of the road contributor who has the potential to do better.

My expectations for Green are not that great – in fact I forgot TO's were a category otherwise I would not have taken him where I did. That being said I think he has breakout potential by virtue of solid playing time coming his way.

Q: Which player (or players) do you see as the most likely to disappoint or be the largest return on investment, relative to their draft position (all teams)?

A: The middle round veteran guys like Barbosa, Nelson, and Harrington have the potential to fall short. I am hoping for a nice return from Jameer Nelson. Last year he was in somewhat of a time share with Keyon Dooling and Carlos Arroyo and his playing time was only 28 mpg. This year the back up is Anthony Johnson who should not represent as much competition.

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