• NASCAR spinning out of control, Wall Street Journal article says
    The Charlotte Observer4 hours ago

    NASCAR spinning out of control, Wall Street Journal article says

    On its front page Wednesday, the nation’s largest newspaper by circulation said NASCAR’s problems “seem to have spun out of control.” “Long a Cultural Icon, NASCAR Hits the Skids,” reads the headline on the article in The Wall Street Journal. One of the article’s two writers, Tripp Mickle, graduated from Myers Park High in Charlotte. The article says NASCAR’s largely working class and white fan base is aging and was knocked harder by the recession than more-affluent fan bases of other major national sports. “There’s no magic pill for this one,” former NASCAR race team owner Ed Rensi told the Journal. “It’s about economics and demographics.” NASCAR also has suffered from a lack of stars, the article

  • NASCAR America: Why young members on driver’s council is a good thing
    NASCAR Talk

    NASCAR America: Why young members on driver’s council is a good thing

    On March 2, the 79-year-old Allison will be inducted into the city of Hampton, Georgia’s Speedway Lane Hall of Fame. Hampton, of course, is the home of Atlanta Motor Speedway, which hosts all three NASCAR racing series that weekend (March 3-5). Established in 2013, Hampton’s Speedway Lane Hall of Fame will honor Allison’s legacy that includes being a five-time winner at AMS, 1983 Winston Cup Series champion and was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2011. Allison joins several other NASCAR luminaries in the Speedway Lane Hall including Rex White, NASCAR Hall of Famers Richard Petty (six-time AMS winner) and five-time AMS winner Bill Elliott, Jeff Gordon (five-time AMS winner), Speedway Motorsports Inc. chairman Bruton Smith and Atlanta Motor Speedway president Ed Clark.

  • Brad Keselowski says more needs to be done to diagnose mild concussions
    NASCAR Talk1 hour ago

    Brad Keselowski says more needs to be done to diagnose mild concussions

    Keselowski said Wednesday at Daytona International Speedway that the next key area for all sports is to “find a definitive way to diagnose a mild concussion. Until we can definitively define a mild concussion, we’re going to have one or two end results. “We’re either going to have drivers sit out when they don’t really have a concussion, or we’re going to have the long-term effect of drivers that have faced multiple concussions and developed CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy), Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, all the things that go with it. As part of its updated concussion protocol, NASCAR announced Feb. 17 that it will require infield care center physicians to incorporate the SCAT-3 diagnostic tool in screening for head injuries.