Big League Stew - MLB

South Carolina dad quits job to see son pitch at College World SeriesDavid Roth vowed he would not miss another chance to watch his son pitch for South Carolina at the College World Series if the Gamecocks returned to Omaha after winning the national championship in 2010.

But when his son's team made it back, David Roth found himself in a tough spot. Unable to get personal time off from work, he needed to make a decision.

Michael Roth announced it on Twitter on Saturday:

How's this for dedication? My dad had to quit his job to make it out to Omaha. Couldn't get here last year. #novacationdays

As decisions go, this one seems as touching as it is impulsive. David Roth, a 57-year-old college graduate, really had quit his job selling Volkswagens and Audis in Greenville, S.C.

He was unemployed but in the stands at TD Ameritrade Park on Sunday, watching his son pitch 7 1/3 innings in a 5-4 victory for South Carolina against Texas A&M.

"Obviously, it was pretty special considering it was Father's Day yesterday," [Michael Roth] said Monday. "I'm glad that he's here. It's been pretty cool having my family here. [...]

"My dad's been a huge inspiration for baseball for me," he said. "It's definitely nice to have him out here."

Definitely nice, yes. But how many parents out there would make, or could even entertain making, the same call?

South Carolina dad quits job to see son pitch at College World Series

Michael Roth has not allowed an earned run in 37 1/3 innings for South Carolina, and his ERA for the season is 0.97. As a result of his success, the Cleveland Indians made him a 31st-round pick in the June draft. Roth is unsigned so far, but even if he signs, he doesn't get many guarantees professionally. His career could be over quickly. It could be over this week.

And that's probably where a lot of his father's motivation comes from.

Most players reach this point in their baseball career only with the help of one or both parents making sacrifices along the way. But these sacrifices usually take the form of long car rides, expensive camps and equipment, and time. And it all might require a parent getting a second job to make it all come together.

But actually quitting a job? In this economy? Noble, sure. Maybe not as noble as donating a kidney or bone marrow, but good luck getting a transplant if you don't have a job and health insurance to pay for it.

What David Roth did was risky, even reckless — depending on many unknown (to us) financial factors for the Roths. But even the gesture — "I have quit my job to watch my son pitch in the College World Series" — it boggles the mind. It's awesome.

Is he worried about his dad getting another job?

"No, he'll be OK," Michael Roth said. "Gamecock Nation will help us out."

Better make sure South Carolina wins again, just in case.

Follow Dave on Twitter — @AnswerDave — and engage the Stew on Facebook

Follow Yahoo! Sports on Facebook and be the first to know about the most interesting stories of the day.

Other popular Yahoo! Sports stories:
Video: Vancouver kissing couple talk for first time
Soccer star's shocking ejection from game
Serena Williams breaks down after Wimbledon win

Related Articles

Big League Stew

Add to My Yahoo RSS

Related Photo Gallery

Y! Sports Blog