• SNY

    Syndergaard felt good, ready for Sunday

    Mets RHP Noah Syndergaard tossed six innings, allowed one run and five hits, while striking out eight batters, as the Mets beat the Marlins, 12-1, in Miami late Tuesday. Syndergaard last pitched Sept. 19, when he was charged with five runs in just 3.2 innings against the Braves. He missed his next start with a throat infection. "I felt great, felt strong out there," Syndergaard said after defeating the Marlins. "I felt like I could locate my sinker to both sides of the plate whenever I needed to. I felt like I was able to get ahead of hitters really well tonight. That was the ultimate goal." In 31 games this season, Syndergaard is 14-9 with 2.60 ERA, 218 strike outs and a 1.15 WHIP. "He gave

  • Fans Gather at Marlins Park for Jose Fernandez's Final Departure in Motorcade Procession
    Good Morning America

    Fans Gather at Marlins Park for Jose Fernandez's Final Departure in Motorcade Procession

    Miami Marlins star pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boating accident Sunday, is being honored in a public memorial service. Pallbearers wearing Fernandez's jersey carried his coffin into a hearse, which left a Miami funeral home for Marlins Park at 1:30 p.m., ABC's Miami affiliate WPLG reported. Once at the stadium, Marlins players surrounded the hearse, placing one hand on it while wearing T-shirts that read "RIP" with an image of Fernandez standing on the pitcher's mound.

  • Pete Rose wrote a letter to the Hall of Fame, pleading to be placed on the ballot
    HardballTalk

    Pete Rose wrote a letter to the Hall of Fame, pleading to be placed on the ballot

    Tim Brown of Yahoo has obtained a letter written by Pete Rose — well, written by his attorney — to the Baseball Hall of Fame, pleading to be placed on the ballot so he could be considered for induction by the BBWAA. The upshot of the argument is that when Rose accepted his permanent ban from baseball, it did not include a ban from Hall of Fame consideration. Which, yes, is true. But it’s also true that soon after the ban, the Hall of Fame — which is a private institution, not owned by Major League Baseball — decided to change its rules and only allow those who are not banned by baseball to be on its ballot. That rule, 3(e), was enacted in February 1991. Which is itself a tad disingenuous, as