Chile wins 7-0 to deal Mexico its worst-ever major tournament loss (Video)

FC Yahoo
SANTA CLARA, CA - JUNE 18: Eduardo Vargas #11 and Alexis Sanchez #7 of Chile celebrate after Vargas scored a goal against Mexico during the 2016 Copa America Centenario Quarterfinals match play between Mexico and Chile at Levi's Stadium on June 18, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

Mexico v Chile: Quarterfinals - Copa America Centenario

SANTA CLARA, CA - JUNE 18: Eduardo Vargas #11 and Alexis Sanchez #7 of Chile celebrate after Vargas scored a goal against Mexico during the 2016 Copa America Centenario Quarterfinals match play between Mexico and Chile at Levi's Stadium on June 18, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

June 19, 2015. Mexico 1-2 Ecuador, Copa America.

That was the last time Mexico had lost a game of soccer – with something of a B-team, by the way.

June 18, 2016. Mexico 0-7 Chile, Copa American Centenario.

That's how that streak came to a savage end on Saturday at Levi's Stadium in a brutal quarterfinals beating by the defending South American champions over the reigning North and Central American and Caribbean champions.

[ FC Yahoo: Mexico sees ugliness on and off the field against Chile ]

For a year, Mexico had gone 15-0-7, in spite of a coaching change after Miguel Herrera slugged a reporter at an airport and was replaced by Juan Carlos Osorio. Under the Colombian, El Tri began the year with seven straight wins. But the dismantling by Chile, one of the favorites in this tournament, was disheveling and complete. To the point where hard questions will be asked about whether Osorio should still be Mexico's coach, in spite of his dream start in the job.

[ COPA AMERICA | Predictions | Scores/Schedule | Standings | Teams ]

If anything, the score flattered Mexico. Because Chile was utterly dominant from the first whistle until the last, totally smothering Mexico with its high press and creating chance after chance after chance.

The scoring began early. In the 16th minute, Edson Puch got Chile's party started. Alexis Sanchez held the ball up masterfully. Marcelo Diaz's shot was then parried into Puch's path by goalkeeper Memo Ochoa. And the forward one-timed a slow bouncer out of Memo's reach and into the net. Ochoa's view was perhaps blocked and obstructed by a man in an offside position. But it wasn't called, and there would be no salvation for El Tri.

That first goal silenced an overwhelmingly pro-Mexican crowd of 70,500 in Santa Clara, Calif., which would pour out of the stadium as the second half lumbered on.

After Eduardo Vargas was disallowed a goal, he got the first of his four – FOUR – goals on the brink of halftime. Sanchez bamboozled his man and the entire defense and found Vargas. He slipped in front of his man with a good touch and tucked the ball behind Ochoa.

And then, after the intermission, the floodgates opened. Chile's relentless pressure high up the field paid off as El Tri was trapped by their own end line. La Roja won the ball back and Sanchez scored after a great exchange with Arturo Vidal.

Not much later, Vargas was fed by Sanchez on an all-too-easy breakaway. He beat Ochoa simply on the one-on-one.

Vargas got his hat trick before the hour, when he was first to a loose ball and slammed it into the upper 90.

And then he pounced on a half-chance from an impossible angle.

Finally, Puch got a second as Chile once again ripped the Mexican defense apart.

The disconcerting thing for Mexico is that Chile probably had another half dozen or so good opportunities to run the score up further. Osorio's deep and talented and familiar team didn't just have a bad night, it failed in every conceivable way. Just as the United States men's national team has surged, the region's best team was battered.

There will be an inquest after this, as there is after Mexican failures on a much smaller scale than this one. The defeat was so comprehensive that much energy will be invested into making sure something like this – Mexico's worst ever loss in a major tournament – never happens again.

Because this was the worst night in Mexican national team memory.

Leander Schaerlaeckens is a soccer columnist for Yahoo Sports. Follow him on Twitter @LeanderAlphabet.

 

 

What to Read Next