Ted Lindsay Award Finalists: Holtby vs. Kane vs. Benn

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Ted Lindsay Award Finalists: Holtby vs. Kane vs. Benn
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  • Patrick Kane
    Patrick Kane
    American ice hockey player
  • Jamie Benn
    Jamie Benn
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  • Braden Holtby
    Braden Holtby
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The NHL Players’ Association announced Friday that Washington Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby and Chicago Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane and Dallas Stars forward Jamie Benn were finalists for the Ted Lindsay Award, which is presented annually to the “Most Outstanding Player” in the NHL.

The award is voted on by members of the NHLPA.

So which one of these guys will win The Ted Lindsay Award?

Why Braden Holtby Deserves The Lindsay

From the NHLPA:  

Holtby, of Lloydminster, Sask., Canada, played in 66 games for the Washington Capitals in 2015-16, helping his team win the Presidents’ Trophy for the most regular season points. Holtby posted a career-high in wins (48), setting a franchise record and tying Martin Brodeur’s NHL record for most wins in a season. He finished fifth in goals-against average (2.20) and eighth in save percentage (.922), and he is also a finalist for the Vezina Trophy. Holtby, a first-time Ted Lindsay Award finalist, is looking to join teammate Alex Ovechkin as only the second Capitals player to receive the “Most Outstanding Player” award. He would also make it back-to-back honours for a goaltender, following Carey Price receiving the Award last season.

Holtby was the best player on the best team in the team in the NHL. While Alex Ovechkin got most of the headlines for his goal scoring, Holtby’s play in net was simply superb with arguably the best season by a goaltender since the 2004-05 lockout.

When Martin Brodeur set the NHL’s single-season wins record in 2006-07, he did so in 78 games played. Holtby hit the mark in 66 games played.  

Why Patrick Kane Deserves the Lindsay

From the NHLPA:

Kane, of Buffalo, N.Y., United States, played in all 82 regular season games for the Chicago Blackhawks in 2015-16. Kane led the NHL in points (106) to earn his first Art Ross Trophy. He also finished first in points-per-game (1.29), first in power-play points (37), second in goals (46), tied for second in power-play goals (17), tied for second in game-winning goals (9), and ranked third in assists (60). Kane’s totals in goals, assists and points all set career highs. He helped lead the Blackhawks to the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season. Kane — a first-time finalist for the Ted Lindsay Award — is seeking to become the first Blackhawks player and the first U.S.-born player to receive the Award.

Kane had the best season of his career by a wide margin. In a year that saw teammates Jonathan Toews and Marian Hossa experience considerable drop-offs, Kane pushed higher than he had ever gone before with 106 points in 82 games. Kane’s 26-game point streak was arguably the most prolific offensive mark reached in the NHL this season.

If the name of the game is to outscore your opponent, nobody did so at a higher level than Kane.

Why Jamie Benn Deserves The Lindsay

From the NHLPA:

Benn, of Victoria, B.C., Canada, played in all 82 regular season games for the Dallas Stars in 2015-16. Benn finished second in the league in points (89) and third in goals (41) — both career bests. He also ranked second in the NHL in points-per-game (1.09) and tied for second in both power-play goals (17) and power-play points (30). Benn set career highs in shooting percentage (16.6%) and average minutes-per-game (20:01). He captained the Stars to a first place finish in the Western Conference. Benn is seeking his first Ted Lindsay Award, as a finalist for the second consecutive season, and he would become the first Stars player in franchise history to be honoured by his fellow NHLPA members.

Benn wasn’t as prolific as Kane, but he was arguably the top all-situation forward in the NHL this season. If the Stars needed a goal, Benn was on the ice. If Dallas needed a big defensive stop, they could trust in Benn. To go along with his offensive accomplishments (finishing second in the NHL in scoring with a career-high 89 points) Benn averaged 1:34 of ice-time on the penalty kill.

After Tyler Seguin’s Achilles injury put him out the rest of the NHL’s regular season, Benn led the Stars to an 8-2-0 record and a Central Division title.

Who Wins The Lindsay?

If the award goes to the player who was considered most outstanding, that would be Kane. His 106 points were most in the NHL, over Benn, by 17 and most of his numbers dwarfed the competition. Remember, this award is not given to the most valuable player, but to the best player. His peers probably took note of his stats when voting.

Who Should Win The Lindsay?

Kane. His numbers were so much better than his competition’s, it’s hard to think the players would vote for someone else.

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