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Shutdown Corner

Washington Redskins get a touchdown on one of the closest calls you’ll see

Frank Schwab
Shutdown Corner

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To this day, when I see the "Music City Miracle" play from the playoff game between Tennessee and Buffalo in 1999, I can't tell if it's a backwards lateral or forward pass. Buffalo fans think Frank Wycheck's toss was forward, Tennessee fans think the pitch that set up Kevin Dyson's crazy touchdown was backwards, and most of the rest of us are on the fence.

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No matter how many times I saw the Washington Redskins' first touchdown of the 2013 season on Monday night, I had the same feeling. Was Eagles quarterback Michael Vick's pass forward and incomplete, or a lateral and a fumble? The officials called it a lateral, which is all that really matters.

On the Eagles' first drive, Vick was standing just inside the 10-yard line, and spun to throw to LeSean McCoy on his right. Washington defensive end Ryan Kerrigan stuck out his arm and knocked the ball out of the air. Everyone stopped but Redskins cornerback DeAngelo Hall, who picked it up and went on the oddest, slow touchdown jog we saw in Week 1. And then he did a Deion Sanders dance to celebrate when he got to the end zone.

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ESPN didn't have one replay that definitively showed if Vick's pass went forward or back. Every angle seemed like it produced a different answer. It was very close either way. Some physics expert might figure it out someday, like they tried to with the "Music City Miracle." Officials reviewed the play and upheld the original call of a backward lateral and Redskins touchdown.

So what did everyone think, lateral or forward pass?

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