What's buzzing:

Shutdown Corner

Green Bay Packers' books show that NFL teams split $6 billion in revenue

In this July 24, 2013 file photo, Green Bay Packers fans and stockholders attend the Packers NFL football team annual shareholders meeting at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wis. The screen at top shows team president Mark Murphy. The Packers offer their annual glimpse into the financial health of the only publicly owned team in the NFL, Thursday, July 10, 2014
.

View photo

FILE - In this July 24, 2013 file photo, Green Bay Packers fans and stockholders attend the Packers NFL football team annual shareholders meeting at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wis. The screen at top shows team president Mark Murphy. The Packers offer their annual glimpse into the financial health of the only publicly owned team in the NFL, Thursday, July 10, 2014. (AP Photo/The Green Bay Press-Gazette, H. Marc Larson, File)

The only publicly held NFL team, the Green Bay Packers, opened their financial ledgers on Thursday and they revealed ... a lot of green.

According to ESPN.com's Darren Rovell, the books indicate that the Packers' 1/32 share of national  revenue was $187.7 million for the league year — multiply that out among all the NFL teams, and it indicates that the league passed the $6 billion revenue mark.

It's believed to be the first time the NFL has surpassed that financial milestone for a single season.

A massive chunk of that revenue comes from the league's television and apparel deals. Packers president and CEO Mark Murphy said the total revenue rose by 4.3 percent from the year prior because of new deals with the NFL Network and from Nike, the league's official uniform provider.

As Rovell writes, that's a whopping rise of 56 percent in revenue from 2006, factoring in inflation.

What's more: That number doesn't even include the $1 billion DirecTV deal, which is up after this season, with a new contract being worked out currently.

As far as local revenue, the Packers are doing just fine there, too, thank you very much. That number is $136.3 million, aided by end-zone-seating renevation and additional sponsorship, was up 6.4 percent from last season.

The Packers' operating costs are high, too, of course. So the profit comes out to a (sarcasm font) mere $25.5 million profit — down more than percent from last season — with a bounty spent on player contracts and operating and new construction costs.

Still. Wow.

We know the NFL is a healthy operation, and we don't know the whole picture, of course, but this one sliver gives us a pretty good indication of just how healthy things are.

- - - - - - -

Eric Edholm is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at edholm@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter!

Sign up for Yahoo Fantasy Baseball
View Comments (8)