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Dr. Saturday

The College Football Playoff selection committee's voting process is meticulous

Sam Cooper
Dr. Saturday
Bowl Championship Series executive director Bill Hancock announces Stanford  University educator Condoleezza Rice, shown on monitors, as a member of the College Football Playoff committee during a news conference, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013, in Irving, Texas. Former Secretary of State Rice, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne and College Football Hall of Fame quarterback Archie Manning are among the 13 people who will be part of the College Football Playoff selection committee in 2014
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Bowl Championship Series executive director Bill Hancock announces Stanford University educator Condoleezza Rice, shown on monitors, as a member of the College Football Playoff committee during a news conference, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013, in Irving, Texas. Former Secretary of State Rice, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne and College Football Hall of Fame quarterback Archie Manning are among the 13 people who will be part of the College Football Playoff selection committee in 2014. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

The College Football Playoff selection committee will reportedly release its first set of top 25 rankings on Tuesday Oct. 28, and now we’re finding out that the process of assembling those rankings is quite meticulous.

Per USA Today, beginning on Monday Oct. 27, the committee will determine the top 25 by following this process:

1. Each committee member will create a list of the 25 teams he or she believes to be the best in the country, in no particular order. Teams listed by more than three members will remain under consideration.

2. Each member will list the best six teams, in no particular order. The six teams receiving the most votes will comprise the pool for the first seeding ballot.

3. In the first seeding ballot, each member will rank those six teams, one through six, with one being the best. The three teams receiving the fewest points will become the top three seeds. The three teams that were not seeded will be held over for the next seeding ballot.

4. Each member will list the six best remaining teams, in no particular order. The three teams receiving the most votes will be added to the three teams held over to comprise the next seeding ballot.

5. Steps No. 3 and 4 will be repeated until 25 teams have been seeded.

Additionally, there is a recusal policy that does not allow committee members who are being paid by a school to list their affiliated school in the rankings. A recused member can participate in the second step, but cannot list the recused team in his or her top six. Beyond that, a recused member cannot take part in the third step if their affiliated school is up for vote.

But wait, there is more.

The committee members will “conduct a thorough evaluation of the teams” between each step and if three members vote to do so, a group of “three or more teams can be reconsidered” even after the rankings are deemed to be complete.

Once the top nine teams are seeded, “the number of teams for Steps No. 2, 3, and 4 will be increased to eight and four” in order to round out the complete rankings.

There’s a lot to go through, but will it eliminate the controversy that often came with the BCS rankings?. That remains to be seen.

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Sam Cooper is a contributor for the Yahoo Sports blogs. Have a tip? Email him or follow him on Twitter!

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