Texas A&M president committed a secondary NCAA violation on Twitter in June

Nick Bromberg
Dr. Saturday

Texas A&M president R. Bowen Loftin is an active Twitter user, though in June that caused him to violate an NCAA rule.

From the Bryan-College Station Eagle:

On June 14, Loftin — who is known not just for his colorful bow ties, but also student engagement and active social media use — tweeted out a seemingly innocuous message: "Enjoyed meeting you yesterday during your visit to #TAMU." Loftin has 26,640 followers on Twitter.

The target of the tweet was 16-year-old Jordan Davis, a 6-foot 4-inch, 250-pound tight end from Clear Lake, who tweeted back, "Yessir it was nice meeting you #gig'em."

Davis had visited Texas A&M the next day and committed. Loftin violated the NCAA rule that prohibits a school from publicizing a recruit's visit to campus. A member of the A&M athletic department saw Loftin's tweet shortly after it was posted and it was later deleted.

A&M self-reported the violation and said that Loftin didn't know the bylaw. According to the paper, an NCAA spokesperson said that "she could not answer the question" if the NCAA would take additional action against Texas A&M.

Here's a guess. They won't. And they shouldn't. With all of the things the NCAA should be worried about like players suing the governing body for compensation for their likenesses and accusations of players getting paid while at school, going after a university president for a Twitter violation would be one of the best examples of misplaced NCAA priorities ever.

Yes, ignorance shouldn't be Loftin's defense, but this would be a ridiculous thign to sanction the university for.