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Texas A&M comes up with a couple more national titles to add to its resume

Frank Schwab
Dr. Saturday

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(Rant Sports)

Apparently, it took Texas A&M almost a century to decide it had won three national titles, not just one.

Rant Sports says A&M has added not only 1919 and 1927 national championships to Kyle Field, as pictured above, but two conference titles, as well. In 1997, Texas A&M lost 54-15 to Nebraska in the Big 12 championship game. In 2010, Texas A&M finished in a three-way tie in the Big 12 South, and didn't represent the division in the conference championship game.

Close enough.

The national championships are a bit more perplexing. Here's what Kyle Field displayed as of a few months ago:

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(Rant Sports)

Let's have Rant Sports explain how two national titles come out of thin air:

In 1919, Illinois, Harvard, Notre Dame and A&M all received a national championship from at least 1 different publication, but Harvard and Illinois received the 1st place vote in more publications.

In 1927, Texas A&M received a retroactive national championship from the "Poling System", a ranking method developed by a Mr. Polin in Ohio in 1935, but it was retroactively given to A&M for the 1927 season.

This wouldn't have anything to do with the Aggies not wanting to feel inadequate compared to their new SEC brethren, would it? Well, they're not the first team to come up with new national championship claims decades after the fact.

So even if you can't beat them, you can always claim you beat them when Babe Ruth was in his prime.

H/T to Rant Sports

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