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Ridiculous lawsuit filed against Johnny Manziel for sexual harassment from his time at Texas A&M

Nick Bromberg
Dr. Saturday
In this Nov. 23, 2013, file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) scrambles to avoid a tackle by LSU defensive end Jermauria Rasco (59) during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Baton Rouge, La. Manziel could be the answer to Cleveland's prayers at quarterback. The polarizing and popular Texas A&M star will likely be available when the Browns pick fourth in next week's NFL draft. But can they handle the Johnny Football Circus?
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Johnny Manziel (AP Photo)

What's a Friday without something bizarre?

A "lawsuit" (we use the term lightly) has been filed against former Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel seeking $25 million in damages for sexual harassment.

The charges? Well, they're ridiculous and something that can't really be printed here becaue of the graphic mental images it produces. Click here to take a look at the suit, which says the allegations started on Valentine's Day 2013. (Click the link at your own risk.) We'll go through why it looks completely bogus.

First, it was filed in a U.S. District Court in central Florida on May 16. However, the address on the filing is listed in Georgia. More specifically, the address is listed as CNN's headquarters.

It's filed in the name of Samantha Schacher, the host of "Dr. Drew on Call" on CNN. (Dr. Drew is actually mentioned in the second paragraph of the lawsuit.) Plus, it's filled with many misspellings, including variations of "Skype" and a total butchering of Jadeveon Clowney's first name, "Jurdereon."

While there's obvious, uh, attention to detail in some of the descriptions, there isn't any when it comes to grammar throughout the filing. It's not the work of someone who is a member of the media.

Schacher told TMZ Friday that the lawsuit was a hoax and "It's a shame you're taking advantage of the legal system. You're playing with people's reputations and careers and it's hurtful."

According to Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network, Schacher's name is an alias and the court clerk termed the person who filed the lawsuit as a "frequent filer."

Manziel's agent, Erik Burkhardt, dismissed the lawsuit as 1 million percent fake.

Burkhardt also told USA Today that "It's insanity. You can read the thing for yourself."

"What some people will do for publicity is just embarrassing," Burkhardt said. "That's all I've got to say."

Outside of some of the graphic allegations inside the lawsuit, it's incredibly hard to believe the alleged NCAA violations in the filing as well. The scenarios themselves don't pass the smell test.

Should it even have been allowed to be filed in the first place? Pro Football Talk's Mike Florio, a lawyer, said the lawsuit is a "hoax so obvious that the clerk of the court should have refused to dignify it with a date stamp or with an assignment of the case to both a judge and a magistrate."

Remember, Florida is in SEC country, too. The use of both Manziel and Clowney could be the lawsuit version of Harvey Updyke's acts against Auburn.

Yes, this is a perfect example of being cautious about what you read without any substantiation. It may be good for a chuckle, but nothing more, and leaves the filer open to a counter-suit for defamation.

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Nick Bromberg is the assistant editor of Dr. Saturday on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at nickbromberg@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

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