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Minnesota coach Jerry Kill starts fund and donates $100K for epilepsy awareness

Sam Cooper
Dr. Saturday
The University of Minnesota football coach Jerry Kill speaks to the media during a news conference on campus regarding his raise, and spring football, Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minn. Kill says he's "getting paid way too much" to be Minnesota's coach but appreciative of the raise and contract extension he received
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The University of Minnesota football coach Jerry Kill speaks to the media during a news conference on campus regarding his raise, and spring football, Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minn. Kill says he's "getting paid way too much" to be Minnesota's coach but appreciative of the raise and contract extension he received. (AP Photo/The Star Tribune, Elizabeth Flores)

Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill has had a well-documented battle with epilepsy and on Thursday he announced that he will be donating $100,000 to a new fund he has started to help children dealing with the condition.

According to the Minnesota Star-Tribune, Kill and his wife have a goal of raising $500,000 for the “Chasing Dreams” fund through the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota to assist “seizure-smart school initiatives” and Camp Oz, a camp for epilepsy patients in Wisconsin.

“We want to get in every single school in the state of Minnesota and educate them on how to handle seizures in the schools,” Kill said.

The “Seizure Smart Schools” initiative ensures that students, teachers and school nurses learn and know how to respond if a student is having a seizure. Kill’s fund will provide training and materials for schools across Minnesota.

Kill was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2005 and has missed several games in recent years due to seizures. He collapsed on the sidelines in the final seconds of a home game in 2011 and took a two-week leave last year after suffering a seizure before the Michigan game in October.

Kill said that if others around him did not know how to react, his October seizure could have killed him.

“They saved my life, and now it’s time for me to help others in our great state,” Kill said.

After recovering from his seizure and watching the Northwestern game from the press box, Kill coached the team from the press box in the Gophers’ final seven games.

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