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Jeff Eisenberg

For the second time in three days, a missed dunk defies physics

Jeff Eisenberg
The Dagger

Either there's some spooky stuff going on in the Big 12 these days, or these physics-defying in-and-out dunks aren't as uncommon as they may seem.

First Kansas State's Jamar Samuels had a dunk go three-quarters of the way down the net and then slingshot back out in the first half of a loss to Kansas on Saturday night. Then almost the identical thing happened to Texas A&M's Kourtney Roberson just 48 hours later in Monday night's 69-49 loss to Texas.

Unlike Samuels' one-handed put-back dunk in which the awkward angle appeared to contribute to the ball popping out, Roberson's slam seemed to be routine. He drove baseline with seven minutes left in the game and went up for a simple two-handed dunk only to have the ball go almost all the way down the net yet somehow come out.

Like the Samuels play, referees did not award Roberson with a bucket, which is the proper call according to Rule 4, Section 33 of the NCAA rulebook. That states a shot only counts when "a live ball that is not a throw-in enters the basket from above and remains in or passes through."

Roberson's bizarre missed dunk was indicative of a brutal shooting night for Texas A&M against Texas' formidable defense.

The Aggies shot only 30.9 percent from the field and 1 of 12 from 3-point range. Leading scorer Khris Middleton missed all nine of his field-goal attempts as the Aggies trailed by 25 by halftime.

Things were going so poorly for Texas A&M that Roberson hardly reacted to the ball popping out of the rim. On a night when everything else went wrong for Texas A&M, even wide-open missed dunks hardly seemed out of the ordinary.

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