Shannon Brown: NBA owners assertions are ‘like a guy who wants to get next to a chick’

Kelly Dwyer
Editor
Ball Don't Lie

Laker guard Shannon Brown told Stephen A. Smith's radio show on Tuesday that the NBA players are ready to lose an entire season, if they have to. That they're steadfast in their resolve, though he conceded that "we don't want to, though." Sounds like the party line continues unabated.

Brown is upset at the general public's apparent unease with the players, and the support for the owners as the lockout persists. The owners are still getting paid by the massive national television deal it signed years ago, while the players stand to lose a wave of paychecks starting in a little under a month.

From the interview:

"They are getting money from the TV (networks) and the TV (networks) are paying them because they want to see us play," Brown said. "So, they're getting paid off our services without us giving any service anyway.

"Does that make us look bad or does that make them look bad?"

The high-flying guard also made an interesting comparison to David Stern's appeal to the masses as he attempts to defend the NBA's position in this labor disagreement:

{YSP:MORE}

"People can tell you anything," Brown said. "It's like a guy who wants to get next to a chick. He's going to tell her anything he wants just to get next to her. Just like the audience and the fans are being told anything (by the owners' side) just to keep them from going super crazy about what's really going on behind the scenes."

Well, I suppose that's one way of putting it. There are certain types of people that will lie through their teeth and say anything they can to establish some sort of relationship, be it fleeting or for all time. Then again, there are other types of people that, I don't know, can't live with themselves after betraying their ideals and acting duplicitous in order to get something that, initially, they can't have.

It's not that the players have exactly been forthcoming in these negotiations, but they do come off far less weasel-y than their counterparts across the table.