Minnesota interviews yet another coaching candidate, no offers yet

Kelly Dwyer

At some point we're going to have to realize that the Minnesota Timberwolves probably won't be hiring a new head coach until the lockout ends. In a way, I can't blame them. There's little point for a small market team to be paying a head coach (especially the big-name head coaches they've interviewed) during a lockout, especially when a hired coach might not get to field a team for another full year (after earning a year's worth of salary).

And there's even less point to tossing a head coach out to the wolves, no pun intended, at a press conference introducing The New Guy that's unable to even hint at the idea that, someday, he might coach players again.

So it should come as a surprise that well-respected veteran coach Rick Adelman strolled in and out of an interview with the Timberwolves without so much of an offer being sent his way.

From the Star Tribune:

His family apparently wants him to take at least a season off, if not outright retire. More than one NBA league executive or coach initially believed the Wolves' job was too big of a rebuilding project at this stage of his life to attract Adelman, who had differences with a Rockets management team that wanted him to play younger players more last season.

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He's expected to command a contract of at least three years and $4 million to $5 million annually -- if not more -- should the Wolves reach an agreement with him.

Adelman follows former Coach of the Year winners Don Nelson, Larry Brown and Sam Mitchell in having discussions with Timberwolves brass that didn't lead to a job offer. The Wolves have done a fantastic job of keeping their name in the papers and keeping their fair-weather fans besotted with the idea of a big-name coach running the team after years of less-heralded (though in the case of Flip Saunders and Dwane Casey, quite good) head coaches running the team.

But until they've actually made an offer, why are we aiding them in their public relations battle? Minnesota publications, I understand. They're doing their job. But we're stepping back.