Ball Don't Lie

Dwyane Wade drops five pounds every game, eats chlorophyll

Eric Freeman
Ball Don't Lie

View photo

.

Dwyane Wade (Getty Images/Isaac Baldizon)

Every time you take a look at supermarket checkout lines and email advertisements, you're sure to learn about a new diet craze. From South Beach to Atkins to Ornish, there's always a new scheme to lose weight. Of course, the best way to lose weight still involves eating well and exercising. But what do I know? What can the NBA possibly teach the world about losing weight?

Apparently quite a bit, and not just via those "Let's Move" ads with Michelle Obama. According to a recent Associated Press piece by Tim Reynolds (via Larry Brown Sports), Wade loses five pounds every time he plays an NBA game. And here's his diet to accommodate it:

"The protein, the drinks, the carbohydrates, I know all the things I need," Wade said. "The biggest thing is that I've talked with a nutritionist, who's working with the team, who understands what we need, how much we practice, what weight I need to be at, what body fat, this, this and this. Put them together, come up with a master plan and I reap the benefits."

One of his secrets: Chlorophyll. 

Yes, the stuff that allows plants to extract energy from light is helping energize Wade as well. 

"I put it in juices for him," said Richard Ingraham, a personal chef for Wade and his longtime girlfriend, Gabrielle Union. "He does a juice now that I make out of beets, chlorophyll, ginger. I'm giving him a nature-made Red Bull. It's all about giving him energy and keeping him as healthy as possible." [...]

Wade loses about five pounds per game, so his postgame meal tends to be as important—if not more so—than the pregame one. Ingraham tends to keep things simple: chicken breast, turkey breast, that sort of thing. On occasion, he says he'll make one of Wade's former favorites as a treat, but for the most part Wade sticks to the better choices. [...]

"He doesn't really like vegetables," Ingraham said. "When I put the salad down, I know that's something he really doesn't want to do, but he knows it can help him. It's not like I'm putting down asparagus. We're taking baby steps. But it works."

Wade has been one of the best players in the league for years, so it's difficult to imagine him becoming even better with an improved diet. But athletes still hit a physical bump at 30 like anyone else, and Wade has learned that he has to adjust his lifestyle if he wants to stay at the top of the NBA. He has the money to make sure everything he puts in his body helps him, so why not make the most of it? If it sometimes involves chlorophyll, then so be it.

[Y! Health: Odd ways to lose weight]

Also, if I may play food critic for a minute, I find it questionable that a personal chef thinks asparagus tastes bad. Just don't steam it, dude.

Other popular stories on Yahoo! Sports:
LeBron James gets engaged to longtime girlfriend | Photos of LeBron, fiancee
High school hockey player paralyzed after hit into boards
Serena Williams says she doesn't love tennis

View Comments