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Donald Sterling will carry on with lawsuit against the NBA, does not support Clippers sale

Eric Freeman
Ball Don't Lie
In this Nov. 12, 2010 file photo, Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald T. Sterling, right, sits with his wife Shelly during the Clippers NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Los Angeles. Donald Sterling has agreed to surrender his stake of the Clippers to his wife, and she is moving forward with selling the team. A person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press Friday.May 23, 2014, that the couple made the agreement after weeks of discussion. The individual wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the agreement
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FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2010 file photo, Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald T. Sterling, right, sits with his wife Shelly during the Clippers NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Los Angeles. Donald Sterling has agreed to surrender his stake of the Clippers to his wife, and she is moving forward with selling the team. A person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press Friday.May 23, 2014, that the couple made the agreement after weeks of discussion. The individual wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the agreement. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

Nearly two weeks ago, it looked as if the basketball world was nearing its long, unfortunate, and disgraceful association with Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. His estranged wife, Shelly Sterling, had reached an agreement to sell the franchise to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer for a record $2 billion, with the league's Board of Governors set to approve the sale. Mr. Sterling, apparently unable to control the deal due to being declared mentally incapacitated and unable to oversee the Sterling Family Trust, said he was almost ready to move on, and his lawyer declared that "all disputes and outstanding issues have been resolved between the couple."

Not so much. On Sunday night, Brian Costa of the Wall Street Journal reported that Sterling was considering moving forward with his lawsuit against the NBA due to a refusal to drop the lifetime ban and $2.5-million fine levied against him by commissioner Adam Silver on April 29. On Monday night, Ramona Shelburne of ESPNLosAngeles.com reported that Sterling and lawyer Max Blecher were going to continue with that $1-billion lawsuit:

The attorney for Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling said Monday his client has instructed him to pursue a $1 billion lawsuit against the NBA and commissioner Adam Silver, and withdraw his support for the sale of the team negotiated by his wife. "The deal is off," Max Blecher wrote in an email. [...]

Meanwhile, Shelly Sterling, Ballmer and the league remain confident the sale will proceed.

"Nobody doubts this thing will go through in the end. I guess it's just a matter of what mood Donald wakes up in tomorrow," one source close to the situation said.

Shelly Sterling indemnified the NBA from damages in future lawsuits from her estranged husband as part of the sale agreement with the NBA. She did so, acting as the sole trustee of the Sterling Family Trust, which owns LA Clippers LLC after two neurologists had declared Donald Sterling unable to conduct his own business and legal affairs.

The provisions of the family trust did not require a court order. To challenge her authority to do that, Donald Sterling would have to challenge her in California probate court, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

Shelburne also notes that Blecher would not confirm if the lawsuit will continue due to the league's refusal to drop the fine and ban, but this turn of events is in keeping with Costa's earlier report. It's also not yet decided if Sterling will challenge the sale to Ballmer by taking Shelly Sterling to court for control of the trust.

On Twitter, Shelburne relayed an official statement from another Sterling lawyer, Bobby Samini:

 

While Sterling and Blecher recently claimed to be done with their fight against the NBA, this change in approach should not come as any major surprise. Last Tuesday, the consistently litigious Sterling said that he was "OK" with the league and Shelly Sterling (in an admittedly confusing statement) even as other reports indicated that he was mulling a lawsuit against his wife, ostensibly in the hopes of saving a reputation that hasn't been in good shape for several decades. For that matter, Sterling has seemed undecided (to put it kindly) on the best method of handling the aftermath of his recorded racist remarks ever since they first became public in late April. When damage control involves simultaneous apologies and insults, it's a safe bet that any words are not bond until the ink is dry on an official statement.

In a typical lawsuit, the next steps would involve official filings and various other procedures. Unfortunately, this case has not progressed in any normal way and remains subject to change. We'll continue to update this story as it develops. Given the precedent of the last weeks, it's a safe bet that something will be altered soon.

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Eric Freeman is a writer for Ball Don't Lie on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at efreeman_ysports@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

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