Big League Stew

Report: A-Rod visited by Biogenesis operator Tony Bosch during 2012 ALCS

David Brown
Big League Stew

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The Miami New Times has published new allegations on the Biogenesis case, including an amusing one that New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez was visited by clinic operator Tony Bosch during the 2012 ALCS. Apparently, what's supposed to be the biggest drug scandal in baseball since (or maybe including) BALCO involves a "doctor" making a house call.

The New York Daily News frames it as such:

According to a former business associate of Bosch, Rodriguez, mired in a slump that had seen him lose his starting job in the series against the Tigers, summoned Bosch to Detroit to help him.

... Porter Fischer says he confronted Bosch about the money owed to him when Bosch returned from Detroit after the Yankees were swept by the Tigers, a series in which A-Rod went 1-for-9.

A baseball source said the Yankees had no knowledge of Bosch traveling to Detroit during the 2012 ALCS.

Now this Bosch guy is a batting coach? Or are his pharmaceuticals more like magic slump-busting pills? How close was A-Rod to sacrificing a live chicken, or doing incantations to get help from the spirit of Charlie Lau?

It wouldn't be believable that A-Rod would risk meeting Bosch in Detroit — except that it's A-Rod. Reality is always a little twisted with him, so keep an open mind about it.

There's more, including Porter Fischer — the person who supplied the New Times with the Biogenesis documents in its original story — saying this:

"The people running Major League Baseball are the biggest scumbags on Earth as far as I'm concerned."

That's saying something, in this company. It's great stuff, the way reality TV can be entertaining trash. There's a high-speed car chase, a smash-and-grab of secret files, plenty of denials by Major League Baseball, death threats and plain envelopes stuffed with cash. Intrigue!

Read the New Times piece, accompanied by a story in USA Today about the MLB's arbitrator, Fredric Horowitz, who will be asked to judge all of this information as it relates to MLB's attempt to punish dozens of players for PED associations.

The bottom line: Horowitz must do what he feels is right, no matter that his decisions just might get him fired, which is what happened with Shyam Das, the previous arbitrator.

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