The Numbers: Roy Halladay already completing games for Philly

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Each week, BLS stat doctor Alex Remington will bring you 10 numbers that you need to know. His debut crop begins with Philadelphia's new ace.

The fraction of Roy Halladay's(notes) starts that Doc has completed in this young season. With the retirement of Randy Johnson(notes) (97 career complete games) last year, Halladay is now the current active leader in the category with 51 and counting. He led the majors with nine wire-to-wire efforts last year and he led the AL in 2003, 2005 and 2007-2009. Coming into Wednesday's games, he was the only pitcher in the majors with a complete game and I'm betting he'll go the distance for the complete game crown. (I've already predicted he'll win the NL Cy Young, so I'm hardly going out on a limb here.)

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The MLB-leading batting average of Atlanta 2B Martin Prado(notes). He took over for a slumping Kelly Johnson(notes) last summer and has Wally Pipped him by continuing to hit. (Johnson is doing just fine, playing second base for Arizona and tied for second in the league with three homers.)

Prado hasn't received much ballyhoo outside Atlanta, where he was a successful backup in 2008 and 2009, but he's opened the year red-hot. If he keeps this up, he'll be a household name and a fantasy bargain in no time.

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Jon Rauch's(notes) MLB-leading save total. He has appeared in five of the Twins' eight games and saved all of them. They certainly aren't missing Joe Nathan(notes) at the moment, which bears out a point that Chris Jaffe made in his book on managers: Ron Gardenhire is the best manager in baseball at building and maintaing a successful bullpen.

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Yes, he's only had one start, but still: Livan Hernandez(notes) is tied for the major league lead in ERA. Who even thought he'd have stayed in the big leagues this long? Since 2006, he has a 5.23 ERA in 130 starts. And while he's been remarkably durable, his remarkable consistency comes in the ability to stay remarkably below-average. Sadly, he's what passes for a frontline member of the Washington Nationals rotation until Stephen Strasburg(notes) gets his promotion.

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Trevor Hoffman's(notes) ERA. In four appearances, Hoffman has earned two saves and blown two others. He's also given up three homers and six earned runs. He had a magnificent year in 2009, but now he's 42 and starting to act his age. His seat begins warming now.

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The number of Gregg Zaun's(notes) 20 plate appearances that have resulted in a twin killing, the most GIDP in the majors. The Milwaukee Brewers catcher is batting seventh in the team's lineup, but he's also 0-for-18 during his spree of recent rally killers. If George Kotteras doesn't get more starts over the next few weeks, Zaun should try to pace himself — he's only 32 double plays away from Jim Rice's all-time GIDP record and he wouldn't want to set that before the All-Star break.

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The number of times that Rickie Weeks(notes) has been hit by a pitch in the young season, tied for the major league lead. Weeks has always been proficient at being plunked — he led the league with 19 beanings over just 95 games played in 2006 — but it might not be the best strategy for him to adopt. He's perhaps the most fragile player in the majors, having played an average of 80 games in his six seasons as the Brewers' second baseman. If he wants to stay on the field, he might consider ducking out of harm's way once in a while.

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The batting average of Rangers rookie outfielder Julio Borbon(notes). In 25 plate appearances this year, his only hit is an infield single and he hasn't walked, been hit by a pitch or even reached on an error. Sure, David Ortiz(notes) is scuffling, but his .436 OPS is still 350 points better than Borbon's horrific .080 mark. Sometimes you get the Show, and sometimes the Show gets you, rook.

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The number of Charlie Haeger's(notes) 116 pitches that have been scored as wild pitches. Haeger's the only knuckleballer in the National League and his catchers aren't the only people having trouble getting a handle on his pitches. Of the 27 batters he faced on April 11, the Dodgers' right-hander has struck out 12 and walked another four. Only three got hits. Unfortunately, one of those three was a three-run homer, but for the rest of the game he was certainly "effectively wild."

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Scott Podsednik's(notes) major-league leading stolen base total. (He's also tied for the major league lead with two sacrifice bunts.) The Royals left fielder may return to earth and start acting his age (34), but he's hitting .452 today and he's stolen a base in three straight games. Just nine games away from Bert Campaneris's all-time record. Come on, Pods!