10 numbers for the NLDS: Rockies vs. Phillies

As the start of the postseason approaches, Big League Stew's Alex Remington will take a look at the statistics that might make a difference in each series. First up is Rockies-Phillies, which kicks off at Philly's CBP at 2:37 p.m. ET on Wednesday.

0.74 Average number of runs the Phillies scored in the first inning — only the Dodgers (0.75) scored more. Everyone knows that scoring early makes it a lot easier to score often and the Phillies are among the best in the business at getting on the board their very first time at bat.

* * *

7 the number of starts this season that Colorado's front 5 haven't made, by far the lowest of all the playoff teams. They've had an incredibly healthy starting staff and each of their starters has a winning record with double-digit victory totals.

* * *

24.9 The average number of at-bats between every Phillie homer, compared to a league average of 36 AB/HR. Among playoff teams, only the Yankees homer more frequently (23.2 AB/HR), but they do it in a league where the average is 31. The Phillies homer about 45 percent more frequently than the average National League team.

* * *

9 Number of home runs Rockie pitchers gave up in six games (a 2-4 record) against the Phillies. The champs have home field advantage and the Rockies are a bad road team. The longball could be decisive.

* * *

.296 The OBP of Jimmy Rollins(notes), who led off 145 games for the Phillies despite being the only starter with an OBP under .300 or an OPS under .700. (Even Pedro Feliz(notes) had an OBP of .308.) Even in the second half, when he doubled his homers and improved his batting average from .229 to .272, his OBP was only .306. The Phillies won't keep winning many games if the former MVP keeps on giving outs away at the top of the lineup.

* * *

1.042 Troy Tulowitzki's(notes) second-half OPS. The only hitter in the playoffs with a higher second-half OPS is Matt Holliday(notes). Tulowitzki's booming bat keyed Colorado's summer surge and if they go far this fall, he'll be prominently involved in the Rockies' postseason success.

* * *

7.21 The ERA of Brad Lidge(notes), who went 0-8 while saving 31 games but blew 11 more. After the 11th blown save, a loss to the Marlins on September 23, manager Charlie Manuel finally gave the closer job to Ryan Madson(notes), their best reliever. But he didn't reassign Lidge's role — each of Lidge's last three appearances came in the ninth inning, they just weren't save situations. As long as he's in the bullpen, Phillie fans will never feel totally safe. Especially if they go far enough in the playoffs to face Albert Pujols(notes).

* * *

.131 The difference between Colorado's home OPS and road OPS — unsurprisingly, the Coors Field Rockies have the biggest gap between home and road OPS among all playoff teams. They also have the worst road OPS among all playoff teams at .718. Unfortunately, they're the wild card team, so they will not have home field advantage in the NLDS or NLCS.

* * *

81 percent The success rate for Phillie basestealers, best in the majors. The Angels and Red Sox both stole more bases than the Phillies, but at a worse clip. The Phillies had four players who stole at least 20 bases this year, and three of them also hit 20 homers — Rollins, Chase Utley(notes), and Jayson Werth(notes). Shane Victorino(notes) only hit 10 homers, but he stole 25. The amazing Utley wins this year's Dustin Pedroia(notes) award by swiping 23 bases and never once getting caught.

* * *

4.53 The ERA of the Rockies' relief corps, highest of any playoff team. (It was 4.18 in the second half, which would still be third-highest among all playoff teams.) The Angels, Cardinals and Rockies all had relief ERAs that were higher than their starters' ERAs, but the Angels and Cards had gaps of 0.05 and 0.01 runs respectively. Rockie relievers had an ERA 0.43 runs higher than their starters.