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Vermont goes ancient Greek for its mascot honors

Cameron Smith
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The Solons are wisely represented by an owl — Wikipedia

The Solons are wisely represented by an owl — Wikipedia

Did you take ancient Greek in school? Ever study Greek history? If not, you might have a hard time following the justification behind the top mascot in Vermont.

That's because the Green Mountain State's top sports nickname is the Solons, a nod to Montpelier (Vt.) High's role as the state capital in a particularly intellectual fashion.

As noted by MaxPreps, Solon was a Greek lawmaker who worked to fend off all social malice in B.C. Athens. Solon has sometimes been credited with setting the groundwork for the Athenian democracy that eventually became a loose model for modern democracies. He was, without question, an inspiring leader.

Now he's the inspiration for the best mascot in the state of Vermont, thanks to one school's spot near the capital dome -- its seat of democracy, if you will -- and its desire to do things a bit differently. How fitting for both Montpelier and Vermont in general.

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Mascot Quest 2013 — Flickr

Other Great Vermont Mascots of Note:

Ludlow (Vt.) Black River High is not Black River Academy. That's because Black River Academy no longer exists. Yet Black River Academy had a very distinguished alumnus: former U.S. President Calvin Coolidge. To keep alive that heritage, Black River High has now adopted the Presidents as its mascot, a fitting nod for an alum by proxy.

If he really had attended Black River High, would they play as the Coolidges?

Fair Haven (Vt.) High competes as the Slaters for a very simple reason: The town is known as the Slate Center of the Nation. That makes Fair Haven one of America's only high schools to honor a building material with its official mascot, a strange and unique distinction worth taking note of.

People often think that Burlington (Vt.) High competes as the Seahorses as a nod to the famed Lake Champlain Monster nearby. Nope. Instead, the justification for the mascot came from geological evidence that first arose when construction for the school began, with crews discovering fossils of seahorses, which archaeologists have pointed to as proof that the area was covered with the ocean before the melting of glaciers.

Common sense and a nice touch from the funky home of Ben and Jerry.

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