Don’t look, but Thomas Bjorn is playing the best golf of anyone

Shane Bacon

We call it the Jason Gore Theory. A guy that most have never heard of, or forgotten about completely, comes into a huge golf tournament and nearly shocks the world, only to fall short at the end. In a game manipulated by the brain, anytime you can impress in front of millions of fans, you have to feel good, and that's what Gore did back in 2005 at the U.S. Open. Yes, Gore tanked in the final round, but that week lifted Gore to a new level, winning two Nationwide Tour events to gain a battlefield promotion onto the PGA Tour, and then went on to win there later in the year.

Cue Thomas Bjorn, the 40-year-old Dane best known for collapsing at the 2003 British Open where he held a four-shot lead well into the back nine on Sunday before letting it all unravel. Bjorn has always been a talent, winning 10 times on the European Tour before this season, and notched his 11th victory in February. But when Bjorn returned to the site of his Open collapse in July, it was where things really revved up. Thomas finished in fourth place alone at the 140th British Open, his highest finish in a major in five years, and grabbed that Gore-like momentum. He played ho-hum at the Bridgestone and PGA Championship, but it was when Bjorn returned to Europe that he found his game.

His final round 62 at last week's Omega European Masters meant for the second straight week, Bjorn would walk away with a trophy. He beat the likes of Martin Kaymer, Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood, all in the mix on Sunday, and showed that confidence on the golf course is an incredible thing.

Now, not only does Bjorn have three wins this season, but he's very much in the hunt for that tour's Player of the Year (and, it's worth noting, he isn't doing any of this with a long putter).

When Bjorn left Royal St. George's back in '03, he was devastated. When he drove away from Sandwich this summer, things must have felt different. He remembered he could play. He figured out he's still a force, and he went out and played with that type of swagger. In a time where it seems nobody is stepping up and dominating golf, it's a little known Dane that keeps winning on arguably the toughest tour in the world.