Greg Cosell

  • Greg Cosell’s mock draft: Picks 1-16

    Greg Cosell at Shutdown Corner11 mths ago

    [Greg Cosell's mock draft: Picks 1-16 | Picks 17-32]

    Here’s picks 1-16 in my mock draft, you can see picks 17-32 here. The parameters I presented for those selections still apply. One other point: I don’t place grades on players based on the round in which I believe they should be selected. I project players to the NFL and then look at team needs. If a player I feel transitions well to the NFL fits a given team, then, as far as I’m concerned, that’s a good pick. If you're looking for quarterbacks, you won't find any first-rounders in this mock draft.

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  • Cosell’s Take: Cornering the market

    Greg Cosell at Shutdown Corner1 yr ago

    In my last column, I focused on the wide receiver position in the 2013 draft. The recurring theme was size, a continuing trend both in college football and the NFL. I mentioned Justin Hunter, Keenan Allen, Deandre Hopkins, Chris Harper, Da’Rick Rogers, among others. The shortest was Hopkins, at just under 6-foot-2; Hunter was the sleekest at 6-foot-4, 196 pounds. With the possible exception of Hunter, who ran an official 4.44 40-yard dash at the Scouting Combine, and is the most explosive vertical receiver on the board, it’s a group whose collective traits reflect their physical dimensions, their hands and their competitiveness as opposed to their speed.

    [Watch: Why Geno Smith could slip in the NFL draft]

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  • The ‘Cosell Doctorine,’ Pt. 2: Ranking the receivers is an impossible task

    Greg Cosell at Shutdown Corner1 yr ago

    At this time of year, leading up to the NFL Draft, everyone wants lists. Who are the top five quarterbacks? The top five running backs? The top five wide receivers? I get asked those questions all the time. They’re difficult to answer, for the simple reason there are far too many variables to categorize individual and distinctive players with the same set of standards and criteria. Part of the equation, as well, is that different teams, based on schemes and utilization, have divergent visions of how best to deploy those players. For instance, how can you possibly compare Matt Barkley and Mike Glennon? If your offense features intermediate and downfield passing as a foundational element, you would not evaluate Barkley very highly. Maybe you have him as a fourth-round pick, if that. Glennon, on the other hand, fits your approach. You might well grade him as a late first, or early second round option.

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